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Hi guys and girls. Newbie here with another problem on my 04 2.5 R5 D. It's the window regulator. Now I'm a self confessed have ago hero so I was wondering if any of you fine TOUAREG loving people had any info or instruction on how to go about replacing a window regulator.

Thanks Steven. Ireland
 

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Yes - take it to your dealer.

The "have-a-go-hero" who replaced his window winder last week managed to jam his driver's door and now can't get in or out of the car and, now the door is firmly shut, can't take the door card off to fix it either.
 

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Wow that's gonna hurt. I am awear of those type of complications. I have a lot of DIY experience on older porches... bmw etc but not on this bad girl. Just looking for some pointers and when I complete task I will post up a complete guide for sell wannabee have ago heros
 

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No Guts , No Glory!! Go for it!
 

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Good advice - just talked to my dealership and tech mentioned me that they get so many window regulator cases where people go to alternative shops, they don't know and screw things up. Dealer is best bet in this case.
 

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I suggest buying the part aftermarket (should be around $100 or less for any door) - and take to someone you can trust, or a dealer.... I believe that VW should charge around $250-300 for the regulator alone, so save the money where you can......


buy the part on your own and pay VW to install, they can't argue that, you're still paying $100 for a one hour job basically

I know it's one hour cause I did my A4 in 1 hour, and that was my first time, I can't imagine the TREG can take that much longer from a pro?
 

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Can you really get a VW dealer to fit a part they didn't supply?

If I were that dealer you might find I'd claw back on the time element the profit I'd lost on the sale of the part.
 

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noobytoogy said:
Can you really get a VW dealer to fit a part they didn't supply?

If I were that dealer you might find I'd claw back on the time element the profit I'd lost on the sale of the part.
Agree, many of the window regulator issues are from bad third party parts. You'll only get them to help you with the exact OEM part, and you might save a little there but it will be even in the end as nooby says, and unclear what it does to dealer goodwill, cause in effect you're telling them where they deserve to make their profit. When you're paying out of pocket it helps to discuss beforehand with service manager and ask If they can help you out, esp if you've had a relationship with that dealership...
 

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noobytoogy said:
Can you really get a VW dealer to fit a part they didn't supply?

If I were that dealer you might find I'd claw back on the time element the profit I'd lost on the sale of the part.
I could only imagine so, I have mechanic that I know can do it, and parts supply through my family.... If you know what aftermarket to buy, you can end up with non VW stamped OEM parts.... But you need to do some homework

Find a vw tech outside of a dealership then?
 

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It can be done!!

I just completed this job yesterday and I know I save $500 to $800 over what the dealer would have charged.

It is a MASSIVE job and you need skills to do this, but here's how it's done.

I bought my window regulator aff of Amazon - this part is a guarantee fit:
Amazon.com: VW Volkswagen TOUAREG Window Regulator LEFT FRONT 04-09 NEW: Automotive

To replace this, get the service manual because there's a lot of good info in there.

Tools:
You'll need a complete set of Torx screw driver heads and torx wrenches for a socket. I don't remember the exact sizes because I already had the set. You need a drill to drill out rivets, and misc. regular old tools that everyone has. It's also helpful to have a chair or sawhorse to support the frame while you work on it.

You also need a pop rivet gun and various sizes of rivets. I bought an assortment set at Pep Boys.

Remove door trim:
There's two small screws under the bottom of the door panel. Take these out. Then behind the door grab bar is a little access panel. Pop this off and remove the two screws underneath. Then grab at the bottom and pop it off. It hangs in a channel at the top, so lift up and slide this out. There are two wires to undo - one on the winder motor and one thin one for something else. Also, disonnect the pull cable for the door release - the little white part pivots out and the pin will slip out of the release lever. Disconnect these and the panel comes away. Note: the one on the window regulator has a zip tie holding it on, so have someone hold the door panel while you remove this and pop the connector free.

Remove the door frame:
You can't get to the window regulator from the inside ... you have to lift the window frame out of the door. This isn't for the faint of heart. The Bently instructions want you to remove the door lock ... I went a route that didn't include doing this.

On the door panel, you'll see a row of 4 rivets along the top holding the metal door sheath onto the door. Drill these out. There are also two trim plates in the upper corners that wrap around the sides of the door with little tiny rivets. Drill these out. In the upper corner by the door lock, you'll see the back of two rivets that hold a plastic support piece for the door lock. Get a grinding wheel and cut these fro the back.

Next there are 10 screws all around the edge of the metal sheath. Take all these out and the panel pops free. Then take the three scres off that surround the window motor. Pull the motor back and you'll see 3 plastic studs clipped in. These hold the gear mechanism for the window.

Finally, check around the edge of the door. There are some plastic panels right below the window channel at either side, and two round caps toward the bottom. Pop all these off to reveal the window frame bolts. With a torx bit and an extension on a socket wrench, remove all 4 of these. The window channel will now be loose and resting on two support pins. Take a moment to study and note where all the wires go and how the frame is resting on the support pins. You'll see the make up of the window frame.

Now grab on and pull the window the whole window frame up, freeing the support pins. Have someone free any wires that get in the way. The panel won't come away completely because of the door lock wires. I really didn't want to mess with these, so once I got the frame clear of the door, I pivoted the top down and rested the bottom on the cross support int he door frame. It'll stretch every wire you got, but I was able to rest this on a chair and lay it horizontal with it still connected. THis is the frame that goes inside the door, the frame and channel up over the top of the window, the mirror ... basically the top half of the door.

Replace the window regulator:
First you gotta take the glass out. There are two screws with big washers in these yellow rider clips. Take these loose and slide the window all the way to the bottom. Pivot the end toward the mirror up the channel and the glass will come free. Be careful to save all the pieces for the yellow riders. There are two little white spacers that you want to save, as well as the yellow clips and the two screws. Carefully set the glass aside. Now you are free to drill out the rivets holding the regulator (4). Make a note of exactly how the cables are routed ... which goes over which and all. One of the cables has a rubber sleeve over it - make sure you get it back on top. When you have the regulator out, lay the new one in and pop rivet it in place. You'll need the extra deep rivets. I bought an assortment set at Pep Boys for $13 that had all the sized I needed (already had the pop rivet gun). With the regulator, you get this little baggie wih two tiny rubber pieces. These go into the glass support mounts. Look at the old one and you'll see that they fit into the side of the support. Clean up the yellow clips and place them over the two supports. Clean the glass and lay it back in place. Remember to put the back edge of the glass in first and pivot in the front end by the mirror. Have a friend do this while you make sure the support pieces and the yellow clips are all in place. Slide the little white plastic strips back into the gap between the support and the yellow part, then fold it over and loosely install the screws. Slide the window closed and make sure it't OK in the channel all the way up, then CAREFULLY tighten the screws holding the glass. NOT TOO TIGHT ... only snug.

With the window all the way up, cut the zip tie that's holding the new gear in the new regulator, being carefull not to let it drop out. Push the three studs through the holes in the metal sheath and they should snap and hold the gear in place.

If everything looks good, lift the window frame back into place. The places where the 4 bolts hold this in have adjustable socket pieces. Make sure these don't fall out. If the frame is too tight of a fit, screw them in a little, then retighten when you have the frame in place. Looking at these will reveal what I mean. Inspect and make sure that you have the frame seated all the way down, the bolt holes line up, and the support pins are seated firmly all the way into their cradles. If it looks OK, then replace the 4 bolts and replace the plastic trim. You've completed the hardest part!!

Now screw the motor back onto the three plastic studs of the gear. Tighten about 3/4 of the way, then reconnect the big wire from the door panel and run the motor just a bit. This will make sure that the gear is seated on the sprocket. Tighten the screws the rest of the way. Now you can test the window. Run it up and down a few times and pat yourself on the back.

Go ahead and remove the door panel again. The next part is to reconenct all the wires, replace the 10 screws, put the 4 rivets along the top in, and rivet in the small trim pieces.

Finally, reconnect the release lever cable and wires on the door panel and hang it back in the window channel. Watch carefully that everything lines up and that the clips are going back into their holes, then smack it with your hand to pop these into place. Install the screws behind the grab bar and the two screws at the bottom of the trim. Then replace the little trim piece behind the grab bar.

You're done!

This is a MASSIVE job - only try this if you are very mechanically inclined. I fully understand why the dealership charges so much for this.

ALSO ... this took me several hours to complete and I ran the battery down having the door open so long. Be prepared to jump or recharge your batteries!!!
 

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Any chance you could do it again with a time lapse video camera running please?
































Only joking! Well done. Great post.:)
 

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Any chance you could do it again with a time lapse video camera running please?
:)
I really don't ever want to see the inside of that door again! But if the passenger side breaks, I'll hire a video crew. But no audio ... you don't want to hear those kind of words.

Normally I would have taken photos but my camera wasn't available.
 

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Here we go again ...

I really don't ever want to see the inside of that door again!
Well - the window regulator broke again. I guess the $74 repair piece wasn't worth the money because the cable popped off the spool and wound around the motor. Right now I've got the window wedged all the way up and I'll check with the dealer for the OEM part. It'll be a while before I'm ready to tackle this again, but I'll get photos next time.
 

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Got it done!

As you see in the first part of this topic, I attempted the window regulator repair with a cheapie replacement part … it worked for a few days then the cable stripped out of the hub.

I bit the bullet and bought the VW part from the dealer that was about $100 more, or $175. But when I got the part out of the wrapper I could tell the quality was much better. The cables were thicker and looked stronger, and the plastic hub was much more robust. I definitely recommend using the authentic VW part because I know you don’t want to do this twice like I did.

I've attached a PDF of the instructions with photos.
Good luck!
 

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I have swapped the regulator mechanism to the driver's window after buying a kit off a well known auction site for £30. I can confirm the quality was not up to VW spec. For example, the replacement cable spool on the aftermarket item is secured with a tie wrap temporarily in position whereas the original is a much tighter fit and snaps in to position. Since my issue was a broken cable (I suspect most are), I was able to use the cable off the aftermarket part and clean up and reuse the original VW spool and fixings. Ignore the earlier comments from one user regarding not allowing the cable to de spool, it is an easy job to wind back in by being careful (you won't get any kinks or twisting if you do it right and you can even do it after you have routed the cables around the pulleys. You don't need to remove the pulleys either as there is just enough room to guide the cables around them and they are then kept under tension once the plastic spring compressor is removed. My only issue is, for some reason, when the window is shut it is very slightly mis aligned at the top by about 0.5 mm - just enough for an annoying wind whistle at speed. I don't know why this has happened since the window moves in rigid channels with no room for adjustment.
 

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My only issue is, for some reason, when the window is shut it is very slightly mis aligned at the top by about 0.5 mm - just enough for an annoying wind whistle at speed. I don't know why this has happened since the window moves in rigid channels with no room for adjustment.
Congratulations on discovering another fix method. It's always great to have options that other owners can explore.

Glad to know you can rewind that ... I was so fearful of that popping out! I was afraid I'd never get it back, especially since I had nothing to look at to make sure I was doing it right.

The misalignment is probably from the yellow retainer clamps that hold the glass at the bottom. On my first attempt, I secured these while the glass was all the way down. Then when I slid it up it was racked and binding in the tracks. On my second attempt, I ran the window all the way up and positioned it correctly with the clamps loose, then tightened them.

It may be too late if you've already buckled everything up, unless you want to get in there again.
 

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Thanks, like you, I never want to see the inside of that door again if I can help it but having stripped and reassembled it several times, I have got it off to a fine art now. I wish I'd have seen your guide before I started stripping it down, it would have probably saved me some time.
Richard
 

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Well, that whistling noise finally got the better of me so stripped the door down again. I can get the frame out without having to touch the door lock mechanism or pulling the electrics through the door skin from the A pillar quite easily now. I found the issue of the misalignment was solely down to cable tension on the idler cabler across the diagonal. If there is any play or stretch the window will naturally pull more on the work side causing it to cant over slightly. This occurs towards the B pillar side on the way up and the A pillar side on the way down throwing the window off line. You may not notice this if you buy the genuine cables but even with the spring tensioners in place there was enough movement on mine to cause a problem. I "cured" this quite simply by unclipping the side slide nearest the A pilar from its runner leaving the cables attached and spinning it twice through 360 degrees, enough to take out all the play in the cable and it now works fine (probably until the cable stretches again). The old addage YOU PAY FOR WHAT YOU GET seems to apply!
 

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It was one of the side sliders effectively putting a kink on one of the cables but it only lasted a couple of months. Bought a genuine set of VW cables and channels (they come as one unit), drilled out the top and bottom rivets and fitted as a whole. A doddle compared to the aftermarket kits and no aligning to do. Got a brand new one s/hand off eBay - no probs.....works fine to this day.
 
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