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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious what the general impression of mileage is of the Touareg owners here. I ask because I've been a little surprised with the impression I get. I understand wanting a car with low mileage - we all do - but I get the feeling that a lot of people here don't think their cars are going to last. Or they are expecting trouble.
I don't do anything special to my cars - just maintain them and fix them when they brake. And they usually last:
1980s Mazda 323 - 235,000 miles when I moved on. It still ran fine with original clutch.
1999 Volvo V 70 - 227,000 miles and it still ran
2008 Acura TL - 205,000 miles and I'm still driving it. Runs perfect, looks great.
2010 Mazda 3 - 197,000 miles and still driving it. Runs fine.
And none of these were diesels. So when I bought a 2016 Touareg TDI with 75,000 miles I thought nothing of it. Beautiful car, looks and runs like new. But after poking around here it just feels like owners are a bit leery. Maybe that just comes with the territory of a car forum where people are very focused on all possible issues.
I'm interested on other's views on mileage expectations of these Touaregs.
 

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I recently purchased a Touareg as well, so I'm new to this particular vehicle. That having been said I have owned 5 VWs in total, and 1 BMW, and 1 Merc, and can tell you this: with the German cars, it is pretty much the same story. It's not about how reliable they are, it's the cost of keeping them reliable and running. I had a 1998 Golf with the 2.0l (2 valve not the 4) with 285000 miles on it. Ran fantastic, amazingly reliable... But was missing 3rd gear lol. The others were a Passat, jetta, and a Corrado. All were fantastic vehicles... But they were not as care free as any of my Japanese cars nor as cheep the keep up with. This is because of German design philosophy: Engineering to the highest standard with low tolerances. The result is some of the most fuel efficient, powerful (compared to displacement), and smooth engines on the planet; but that all comes at a cost. The Germans can squeez 400#s of torque out of a 3.0l diesel, which is quite impressive and versatile, but it will cost you $3k-$6k when an engine component breaks... which will happen at some point and obviously, like all cars, the odds go up the closer to 100k miles you get (and beyond) or much sooner if something as simple as the wrong coolant type was used or mixed in... so here is where the reluctance and skepticism comes in: if YOU are not the original owner and there aren't long kept maintenance records for it, you could be getting a great vehicle or you could be buying a time bomb because some yahoo was treating his VW like it was a Honda accord, or thought the fluids listed in the manuals were only suggestions. The problems with VWs, or any German car for that matter, isn't that aren't reliable (aside from BMW hahahaha) it's that they are twice as expensive to maintain and repair when the inevitable happens... Although VWs are known for thier buggy electronics... 3 of my 5 have proven that correct lol.

In your list, you said a V70 so, although swedish made, you have some idea of how important keeping up with the maintenance is.

I purchased my T3 with 96k miles on it. It had well kept maintenance records and was incredibly clean for that kind of milage.... And it was 3k under blue book because of a pricing error lol. That being said, I have found a couple components that need to be fixed, like the wiper blade switch; A $250 part... So things like that will tax you and cost you more than a Toyota or Honda would, but they don't drive like a VW that's for sure!
 

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279000kms here second owner got it at 230k only had silly issues like water leaking from sunroof drains. cracked coolant hose am happy if the car gives me 350k without major engine failure
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I recently purchased a Touareg as well, so I'm new to this particular vehicle. That having been said I have owned 5 VWs in total, and 1 BMW, and 1 Merc, and can tell you this: with the German cars, it is pretty much the same story. It's not about how reliable they are, it's the cost of keeping them reliable and running. I had a 1998 Golf with the 2.0l (2 valve not the 4) with 285000 miles on it. Ran fantastic, amazingly reliable... But was missing 3rd gear lol. The others were a Passat, jetta, and a Corrado. All were fantastic vehicles... But they were not as care free as any of my Japanese cars nor as cheep the keep up with. This is because of German design philosophy: Engineering to the highest standard with low tolerances. The result is some of the most fuel efficient, powerful (compared to displacement), and smooth engines on the planet; but that all comes at a cost. The Germans can squeez 400#s of torque out of a 3.0l diesel, which is quite impressive and versatile, but it will cost you $3k-$6k when an engine component breaks... which will happen at some point and obviously, like all cars, the odds go up the closer to 100k miles you get (and beyond) or much sooner if something as simple as the wrong coolant type was used or mixed in... so here is where the reluctance and skepticism comes in: if YOU are not the original owner and there aren't long kept maintenance records for it, you could be getting a great vehicle or you could be buying a time bomb because some yahoo was treating his VW like it was a Honda accord, or thought the fluids listed in the manuals were only suggestions. The problems with VWs, or any German car for that matter, isn't that aren't reliable (aside from BMW hahahaha) it's that they are twice as expensive to maintain and repair when the inevitable happens... Although VWs are known for thier buggy electronics... 3 of my 5 have proven that correct lol.

In your list, you said a V70 so, although swedish made, you have some idea of how important keeping up with the maintenance is.

I purchased my T3 with 96k miles on it. It had well kept maintenance records and was incredibly clean for that kind of milage.... And it was 3k under blue book because of a pricing error lol. That being said, I have found a couple components that need to be fixed, like the wiper blade switch; A $250 part... So things like that will tax you and cost you more than a Toyota or Honda would, but they don't drive like a VW that's for sure!
Well said, thank you for the thoughts.

I'm glad you were both comfortable buying Touaregs that were not "low miles" and I'm sure you're enjoying them.

Mine was one owner and well maintained and anyone that's ridden with me thinks it's like new. So we will see.
Whenever I get a nice car (and this one definitely qualifies) I immediately think I want to keep it for a long time and that means many miles in my case.
 

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I bought a 2014 new. Now have a little over 310k KM (just under 200k miles) on it. I would not hesitate to drive it cross country tomorrow. I have only done routine maintenance and a couple small repairs under warranty. Nox sensor when it was new, one adblue heater (was reimbursed by vw) and egr cooler after the fix. When they did the cooler I paid to change the water pump since I was close to 300k. One set of brakes. No other repairs or breakdowns. My last few cars I have kept past 200k and the all seemed to "show their age" after a certain point. Not this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I bought a 2014 new. Now have a little over 310k KM (just under 200k miles) on it. I would not hesitate to drive it cross country tomorrow. I have only done routine maintenance and a couple small repairs under warranty. Nox sensor when it was new, one adblue heater (was reimbursed by vw) and egr cooler after the fix. When they did the cooler I paid to change the water pump since I was close to 300k. One set of brakes. No other repairs or breakdowns. My last few cars I have kept past 200k and the all seemed to "show their age" after a certain point. Not this one.
Love it!! Great to hear! Enjoy.
 

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Miles are a consideration on a used vehicle, especially a Touareg, because of the importance and expense of maintenance. As miles go up, so do the maintenance requirements and odds that non-maintenance items will require replacement, such as the HPFP. Maintenance is much more expensive on a Touareg than say, an 80s Mazda 323 or 90s Volvo.
The Touareg is a complex and complicated vehicle- much more so than the other vehicles in your list. If you purchased a high-mileage Touareg with the idea it would be maintenance free, or similar in maintenance to an 80s Japanese car... I think you're in for a surprise. If you know the risks and costs and it works for you- great!
 

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Technology means complexity.
Complexity means costly to diagnose\fix maintain.
It all comes down to your perspective. Keep up with maintenance and accept the fact that you're driving a technologically advanced vehicle, so down't buy your parts off ebay or amazon and use proper fluids etc. As you can see above some users report getting solid use our of their rigs. When things break or wear (and they will), it will be more costly than just fixing some farm tractor or POS Prius, etc.
I've seen many Eggs for sale with well over 200k miles on the clock. Even the scary v10s that eat cams. It's all about proper maintenance. I regularly see high milage 3Ls and it would seem that most "lemon" stories steam from units that have just been driven and not maintained, or poorly maintained and or\butchered by previous owners.

@Lance_1 above is a perfect example of what a properly maintained unit should be like.
My egg is still young (only ~133k kms) so I can't speak about it's history, but I can relate with my other TDI (2L) which I'm still driving daily, and I recall a decade ago when I got it how everyone was telling me that my HPFP is going to blow up. I'm not at ~272K+ kms and can't imagine getting rid of it. Just like @Lance_1 , I wouldn't hesitate to jump into it right now and drive it across the continent, without even checking it's oil level..... that's how rock solid these TDIs can be if you are on top of the upkeep.

Clearly opinions will vary, and this is only my opinion.
 

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@TurboABA perfectly worded! It's crazy how often people put down the Euro cars because they lack knowledge and discipline. I get it's hard to adapt to... My Jetta was a crash course when coming from a Toyota and Nissan previously... But that was all it took. I've been hooked on VW, and Euro cars, ever since! They may cost more, but they are a hell of a lot more fun to drive!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Miles are a consideration on a used vehicle, especially a Touareg, because of the importance and expense of maintenance. As miles go up, so do the maintenance requirements and odds that non-maintenance items will require replacement, such as the HPFP. Maintenance is much more expensive on a Touareg than say, an 80s Mazda 323 or 90s Volvo.
The Touareg is a complex and complicated vehicle- much more so than the other vehicles in your list. If you purchased a high-mileage Touareg with the idea it would be maintenance free, or similar in maintenance to an 80s Japanese car... I think you're in for a surprise. If you know the risks and costs and it works for you- great!
I bought one with 75,000 miles (I don't consider it high-mileage), very well maintained that looks like new inside and out with a solid factory warranty. I definitely didn't expect it to be maintenance free. I always maintain my cars well, but that shouldn't be a big deal. Scheduled maintenance should be enough. Obviously things break and need to be fixed, but hopefully that's the exception and not the rule. As far as being similar in maintenance to an 80s Japanese car...
I get it that these cars may need more expensive parts, specialty tools or a certain level of expertise and that's going to cost more to maintain and repair. But if you follow the manufacturer's service schedule - whether German, Japanese, American or whatever - maintenance should be maintenance.

Being complicated, complex, technologically advanced, or engineered to a low tolerance should not be a reason or an excuse to need more frequent repairs or a special maintenance schedule other than what's recommended by the manufacturer. If that's the case it's just poor design or construction.

@TurboABA perfectly worded! It's crazy how often people put down the Euro cars because they lack knowledge and discipline. I get it's hard to adapt to... My Jetta was a crash course when coming from a Toyota and Nissan previously... But that was all it took. I've been hooked on VW, and Euro cars, ever since! They may cost more, but they are a hell of a lot more fun to drive!
Again, if you perform routine scheduled maintenance why should you need a lot of knowledge and discipline?

Not trying to start a German vs. Japanese thing because I really love my Touareg. But I've got a 2008 Acura TL in the garage. Give it gas and you know it - it's Japanese and FUN to drive!
 

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Lol did I strike a nerve? Trust me, japanese cars have a place in my garage as well, but there are certain things the Germans do better... There's a reason the VW Golf is the best selling car Europe.
 

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But yes, simple answer do the maintenance when it's needed, fork out the extra cash for good quality parts, and pay attention to the car and she will last a long time... But there's no getting around the extra expense of the repair bill when it does eventually happen, that's just German cars in general.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
But yes, simple answer do the maintenance when it's needed, fork out the extra cash for good quality parts, and pay attention to the car and she will last a long time... But there's no getting around the extra expense of the repair bill when it does eventually happen, that's just German cars in general.
Took the first road trip in my "new" Touareg TDI this weekend and loved it. I don't think I'll mind spending a bit of cash when needed to keep it running smooth!
 

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I believe mileage is a by-product of correct care and maintenance.

Previous cars I had to my Touareg included Aus built Ford V8s, a 2004 S/C Mustang Cobra, and 3 Explorers.

The Cobra had "only" 105,000km on it when I sold it and still ran like new.

All of the others ran a lot higher and the Explorers were at 200k+, 300k+, and 400k+. All ran and operated as they should because they were:

a) looked after properly, not just used as a solution to get from one place to another,
b) maintained correctly and repaired as required - and by required I mean if you notice something's off then fix it before it becomes a problem, and
c) didn't look like they had a quarter of their actual mileage on them

Just because Touareg's are more complex doesn't make them more of an issue, rather it gives opportunity to be able to analyse the data available, unlike older cars. Computers can tell you when something is not functioning correctly as opposed to "Gees Barry, that Yoyota of you're is running a bit rich don't ya think?".

So too, old or new, don't just be a steering wheel attendant, drive your vehicle and "feel" what it's doing as it goes down the road. Listen for anything out of the ordinary, have a proper look around regularly, and care for your investment that just happens to being you a lot of joy!

Recently I looked at a V8 R-Line. 2016 Plate, 80,000km on it, but a definite 50ft car...Looked great from 50ft away...

By chance, the VIN showed up on a Google search at another dealership 12 months earlier, with 15,000km less on it, and for $3K more. Who buys a $60K motor vehicle, keeps it for 12 months, puts 15,000km on it, then does their dough trading it in?? Didn't make sense so I wanted to see up close.

"This vehicle has been through our workshop and been reviewed by our master technicians". Sounds impressive.

Have key at the ready, push starter button...

MFD needs oxygen for exhaustion after all of the alerts it's giving me. "So...salesman guy - master tech didn't think ANY OF THESE system warnings were important?". "Oh, well, you'll have warranty so we can get all of that fixed for you". Hmmm...can't fix the fact that it looked like a bag of angry cats had been let loose inside, and "What about this underbody damage here?".

Yup, it was a lemon. Probably mostly due to being treated like a cheap plaything (when it's definitely not), and poor consideration for 'proper' maintenance. Intact service log books are only the first part of the ownership equation. Unless a vehicle has been serviced and investigated properly at each interval, combined with an owner who actually wants their vehicle to remain in an excellent working state, then mileage is of absolute importance as to a starting point on how much it's going to cost to bring back to being good again.

It mightn't be as cheap as fixing a 1980's vehicle, and hell, I could do most of the things under the hood in those days cause I could see around the motor and all the way to the ground, but maintained properly and cared for as it should be, I can see something like a Touareg outlasting anything of the older classes so bring on the mileage I say. Road trip anyone??

Oz
 

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Discussion Starter #16
but maintained properly and cared for as it should be, I can see something like a Touareg outlasting anything of the older classes so bring on the mileage I say. Road trip anyone??
Now you're talking! That's really the point of my original question. I guess I took the the part about excellent care and maintenance for granted, because I'd assume most owners do that.

Great opinions of everyone here.
 

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Turbo ABA - Actually yes I am still on the factory tranny fluid. Diffs and transfer case have been done. The car has had an easy life - largely highway KM, very little towing and when it did it was light. This one I am really on the fence on - do I do at least a drain and fill to mix some new fluid in or just leave it as is? Either one can either be good or very bad.

To expand on some of the other notes above - I am a firm believer of OEM parts. To save a few bucks using knockoffs is false economy.

Also the quality of the service I believe is very important. i.e. fuel filter change - do you just bang it in and start the car or do you prime the fuel system with vcds? I believe in the latter. I do pretty well all my own maintenance for this reason. I farmed out a few jobs to the dealer when it was a job that i needed done right away i.e adblue heater in the winter and I was busy. But when I do it myself I can be slow and methodical - im not on the clock to hit productivity numbers. Check other things when under the car. etc.
 

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I've had seven Volkswagen and Audi cars and they have all been excellent. what it comes down to is how the person treated them before you. I've put hundreds of thousands of miles on almost all of my Volkswagens, I think one of my Audi I sold with relatively low mileage maybe 120 or 130,000 mi. But all of my other ones have been right around 200 to almost 300,000 miles. and I must admit, most of the issues that I've ever had for my Volkswagens is because I had cheaped out and put poor quality parts on or I installed said parts improperly.

With that being said I've also had eight or nine maybe 10 Japanese cars. In fact in our driveway right now we have a TLX sh - AWD that we bought brand new. It's an absolute blast and we've been starting to mod at the past year or so. It's an absolute monster and is just incredibly fun to blow through ski country in that loud VTEC hitting v6.my Japanese cars have hands down been cheaper to own and more reliable. By reliable I mean they have needed less things replaced. also with that said none of my Volkswagens have ever stranded me or let me down in any capacity. I've blown turbos but have been able to limp home on them. well actually I guess I did blow out a half shaft once on a car making nearly 400% more torque on almost 250,000 mi half shafts, so yeah I guess I was stranded there but luckily it was a block over from my house when I punched it making a left hand turn through a red light... That was definitely my fault.

Japanese and German cars both have their place. They are both awesome and a blast and have their pros and cons. they both have their own souls also, which is a lot more than I can say for any American car minus the viper and the corvette.
 

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Turbo ABA - Actually yes I am still on the factory tranny fluid. Diffs and transfer case have been done. The car has had an easy life - largely highway KM, very little towing and when it did it was light. This one I am really on the fence on - do I do at least a drain and fill to mix some new fluid in or just leave it as is? Either one can either be good or very bad.
Awesome. My vote would be to do a flush on it. I highly doubt that you would have a negative experience, and by the sounds of it, you're not ready to give up on your egg any time soon, so why not get another 200k out of it?
 
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