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Hello chaps, this would be my first attempt to share something useful here, though I have my V10 for about two years by now. I have seen many questions about the head cover gasket, and indeed, it is not replaceable separately. I worked at Porsche Hungaria for a brief period of time, and we have seen many 2.5 and 5.0 diesels with 5his problem. Of course those who had their cars repaired at Porsche, either had loads of money, or had somesort of a warranty, so we just ordered a new and it was done. Sadly I am not amongst those who have the access to trillions, and an airforce, so I have to do what can be done. Also after I have the generator, starter motor, and both turbos refitted, and all the PD pumps' seals and heat shields replaced, I started to run a bit low on capital. The main issue I had with the car was that about half a quart of oil have repositioned itself every day, out of engine. First I thought the turbos were on their last legs as some oil was in the lower intercooler pipes. So I got the engine out and found that the generator was up to the axle in oil. So I replaced all the seals in the oil module, and the O rings of the fuel tubes, and just because why not, I did the tandem pump and the fuel pump also. As I was about to put the covers up I noticed that the rubber had separated, and it was leaking oil from under the rubber. Now there is no way that I am going to pay another turbos worth of money, I started to use my oldtimer senses, as I have a 1961 two stroke Pannonia to be mended weekly. So a bit of silicone instant gasket or whatever, and a sharp knife is to be used. I had all the screws oiled up, and gently pulled out. Then with the knife I have cut around the screws washer-y thing, as we need that little edge to hold the gasket on the cover after the operation. Of course then comes the cleaning story, I advise using some sort of brake pad cleaner spray, it is quite effective, just be careful with the cigarettes... after the cleaning a bit of silicone gasket goo in the groove, or on the gasket itself, and then just put it back to its place, and pull the little rubber tubes for the bolts with a needle nose plier or something. Also back in the Porsche Hungaria, we used to put a bit of silicone stuff in the corners of the camshaft-bearing block on both ends of the head, and also about an inch forward from the gearwheels, as the gearwheel housing and the cyl. head not always line up perfectly, and may cause a leak after a couple of heat cycles... Thanks for the attention, have a nice time with your Tregs chaps!
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A small amount of oil in the charge air hoses is perfectly normal and originates from crankcase ventilation / PCV valve. Fumes are routed back into the intake path right before the turbo. Of course the turbo can also leak, but even if it's not, there's always some oil in the charge air hoses, in the intercooler, and at the intake manifold.
 

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Indeed I thought the same, and I was thinking that my pcv valve is rubbish, and remains open all the time. From the intake manifolds I have freed around two pounds of soot and oil with the help of petrol and the misses' jar cleaning brush thing. The EGR was just a column of oily stuff, and the butterfly couldn't close properly. Quite an odessey that was. And I hope that I wouln't have to have the engine out again in the next two or three years, that's why the overkill. Cheers.
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Imo it's not an overkill at all to get the intake manifold and the EGR and anti-shudder valves perfectly clean every 50-60.000 miles, because the buildup in them affects the engine's workings immensely, and obviously not in a positive way. A restricted intake path not only puts more strain on the engine and on the turbo because of the smaller diameter, but also causes turbulences in the air, which in turn result in even more buildup, not only at said components but also at the intake ports and valves. So, the more often one cleans the intake (which is a relatively easy DIY not requiring any special tools), the less problems one will have down the combustion path and down the road, needing fixes that are usually out of reach for the average non-mechanic DYIer.
 
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