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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
If it was my previous

ah - fair enough... Mine had the same mileage when I traded it... It was an awesome vehicle, but it let me down & left me stranded on the roadside... no transmission action at all - not even Park. It was a simple & cheap fix. The actuation arms (?) going from the shifter to the gear box came detached - - while driving. It was a scary moment for sure.
But - I bought it to tow as we flip houses - it was comfortable, powerful, roomy & looked good. The WB Ed actually has a couple of features the Exec didn't... vented seats for one... I don't think you'll go wrong w/ either thou. Good luck!
Thanks for sharing your experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I have a '12 TDI and love that I have the diesel. I haven't driven the gas version but I can't imagine I would ever swap it with my Diesel. If your not towing and don't drive on longer road trips maybe your experience would not be the same.

To the previous post comments. If your new to Touareg then be prepared maintenance is more costly than the average vehicle.
Thanks Dude for your suggestions.
 

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The WB Ed actually has a couple of features the Exec didn't... vented seats for one... I don't think you'll go wrong w/ either thou. Good luck!
If I remember, ventilated seats (AC air blown out through the seat cushions) was added in 2016. It's not a mater of Exec vs Wolfburg.

My 2014 TDI Exec has been reliable. Just a few nonessentials breaking down (area view camera, sunroof shade motor, piece of trim on the door handle keeps coming off). The only mechanical failures have been emissions-related, and covered under the extended 10 year warranty for TDIs.

That said, repair costs and parts have been a lot higher than for my previous cars. So you won't take it into the shop any more than a regular car, but you'll pay a lot more when you do.

The tires, while expensive, aren't substantially more than regular mid- to high-tier SUV tires. Just be aware that most owners report about half the rated mileage (e.g. a tire rated for 60k miles needs replacing after about 30k). And there was a post here recently by a guy towing who had his new rear tires go bald within a few thousand miles. I suspect if the load is unevenly distributed, the AWD system works in such a way that it chews through tires. (Speaking of which, you have to rotate regularly even though it's AWD. The system is happiest when the tires are the exact same diameter.)

My TDI reports 36 MPG highway @ 65 MPH empty, about 31 MPG w/ 4 occupants. 31 MPG @ 70 MPH empty. 29 MPG @ 75 MPH empty. In city driving it's around 21-22 MPG (used to be 24 before the diesel fix). Overall average has been about 25.5 MPG. Towing a 7700 lb boat I got around 12 MPG around the city, 15 MPG on the highway @ 55 mph.

However, the MPG the car reports is exaggerated a bit. It's consistently read high when I fill the tank and run the MPG calculations manually. Subtract about 7%-10% to get the actual MPG. Probably closer to 7% since I run diesel additive to reduce diesel clatter. Yielding a corrected overall average of just under 24 MPG, which is pretty much spot on with the EPA estimate.

Diesels like to be run for a long time, at moderate to high load after they've warmed up and the temperature stabilized. Run that way, they can exceed 40% efficiency. Which about equals or slightly beats the cycle efficiency of an EV using electricity generated from a fossil fuel power plant. (Diesels in large trucks and trains can exceed 50% efficiency, and in ships can approach 60%.) And it'll probably last several hundreds of thousands of miles.

But if you're using the car mostly for short city drives, you won't come anywhere near this. And your mileage and engine wear will suffer as a result. On top of this, they have a DPF (diesel particulate filter) which captures larger soot particles. Every once in a while (I'd guesstimate about every hour or two of operation), the car runs a DPF-cleaning cycle. It heats the filter up to extremely high temperatures to burn off the soot (convert it to CO2). But it needs to be running on the highway to do this properly. So you do need to drive it regularly on the highway (at speed, not in stop and go traffic).

One last tip if you get the TDI. It's got a massive 26.4 gal fuel tank which can get you 700+ miles between refills. But don't let the tank drop below 1/8 full (where the red starts), and preferably refuel when it hits 1/4 tank. The engine uses excess fuel to dump heat from the fuel pump system. And from what I hear, running the tank too low can impede that, leading to an early demise of parts. The high pressure fuel pump is the most expensive part in the car (around $10k to replace), so you don't want to do anything which makes it unhappy. You'll still get ~500 miles if you refuel at 1/4 tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
If I remember, ventilated seats (AC air blown out through the seat cushions) was added in 2016. It's not a mater of Exec vs Wolfburg.

My 2014 TDI Exec has been reliable. Just a few nonessentials breaking down (area view camera, sunroof shade motor, piece of trim on the door handle keeps coming off). The only mechanical failures have been emissions-related, and covered under the extended 10 year warranty for TDIs.

That said, repair costs and parts have been a lot higher than for my previous cars. So you won't take it into the shop any more than a regular car, but you'll pay a lot more when you do.

The tires, while expensive, aren't substantially more than regular mid- to high-tier SUV tires. Just be aware that most owners report about half the rated mileage (e.g. a tire rated for 60k miles needs replacing after about 30k). And there was a post here recently by a guy towing who had his new rear tires go bald within a few thousand miles. I suspect if the load is unevenly distributed, the AWD system works in such a way that it chews through tires. (Speaking of which, you have to rotate regularly even though it's AWD. The system is happiest when the tires are the exact same diameter.)

My TDI reports 36 MPG highway @ 65 MPH empty, about 31 MPG w/ 4 occupants. 31 MPG @ 70 MPH empty. 29 MPG @ 75 MPH empty. In city driving it's around 21-22 MPG (used to be 24 before the diesel fix). Overall average has been about 25.5 MPG. Towing a 7700 lb boat I got around 12 MPG around the city, 15 MPG on the highway @ 55 mph.

However, the MPG the car reports is exaggerated a bit. It's consistently read high when I fill the tank and run the MPG calculations manually. Subtract about 7%-10% to get the actual MPG. Probably closer to 7% since I run diesel additive to reduce diesel clatter. Yielding a corrected overall average of just under 24 MPG, which is pretty much spot on with the EPA estimate.

Diesels like to be run for a long time, at moderate to high load after they've warmed up and the temperature stabilized. Run that way, they can exceed 40% efficiency. Which about equals or slightly beats the cycle efficiency of an EV using electricity generated from a fossil fuel power plant. (Diesels in large trucks and trains can exceed 50% efficiency, and in ships can approach 60%.) And it'll probably last several hundreds of thousands of miles.

But if you're using the car mostly for short city drives, you won't come anywhere near this. And your mileage and engine wear will suffer as a result. On top of this, they have a DPF (diesel particulate filter) which captures larger soot particles. Every once in a while (I'd guesstimate about every hour or two of operation), the car runs a DPF-cleaning cycle. It heats the filter up to extremely high temperatures to burn off the soot (convert it to CO2). But it needs to be running on the highway to do this properly. So you do need to drive it regularly on the highway (at speed, not in stop and go traffic).

One last tip if you get the TDI. It's got a massive 26.4 gal fuel tank which can get you 700+ miles between refills. But don't let the tank drop below 1/8 full (where the red starts), and preferably refuel when it hits 1/4 tank. The engine uses excess fuel to dump heat from the fuel pump system. And from what I hear, running the tank too low can impede that, leading to an early demise of parts. The high pressure fuel pump is the most expensive part in the car (around $10k to replace), so you don't want to do anything which makes it unhappy. You'll still get ~500 miles if you refuel at 1/4 tank.
Thanks! Very nice !
 

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There is the other matter of CO2e emissions.

I bought a TDI because it released less CO2 than the petrol (gasoline) Touareg. I thought that I was doing the right thing for the environment. Then I found out that the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions had 296 times more short term greenhouse gas effect than CO2. However, I can't find out how much NOx is released by the TDI in comparison to CO2 so I can't really compare the affect my vehicle has on climate change.

Now I'm a bit sorry that I bought a diesel but, because of our lousy federal government's policies, there are no hybrids available in Australia.
 

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There is the other matter of CO2e emissions.

I bought a TDI because it released less CO2 than the petrol (gasoline) Touareg. I thought that I was doing the right thing for the environment. Then I found out that the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions had 296 times more short term greenhouse gas effect than CO2. However, I can't find out how much NOx is released by the TDI in comparison to CO2 so I can't really compare the affect my vehicle has on climate change.

Now I'm a bit sorry that I bought a diesel but, because of our lousy federal government's policies, there are no hybrids available in Australia.
Don't worry about the paltry amount of emissions your diesel shoves out, Australia doesn't even register on the list of world emitters
 

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Don't worry about the paltry amount of emissions your diesel shoves out, Australia doesn't even register on the list of world emitters
But Australians are some of the biggest contributors per capita and we all need to do our little bit. I just can't find how much NOx my TDI emits. That would be helpful.
 

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OP as long as you don't mind carrying a box or two of Blue Def with you and you have longer daily drives go for the TDI. I was fortunate enough to find a pristine CPO one owner V6 Wolfsburg gasser which is exactly what I wanted except for the black leather which I can certainly live with. TDI was never even a consideration for me, just more crap you have to be aware of and at my advanced age I just couldn't be bothered.
 
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