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So, I have now become a new fan of Seafoam carbon liquifier. After much careful research, I took the plunge and treated my Touareg TDI injectors with this liquifier by adding two cans of it to a half-full tank (50L of diesel). I then drove 100km to get the Seafoam pushed through the fueling system. I did get mild white smoke that dissipated quickly, and vanished after about 50 km.

While this is certainly a subjective assessment, my TDI throttle response substantially improved with Seafoam in the fuel, and the V6 began to rev much more freely, all within the first 25 kms of the treatment. I suspect I had substantial injector deposit buildup because the perceived improvement was very noticeable.

Emboldened by the tangible results, I pulled out the 9-year-old SnoTek snowblower. I ran the little single-cylinder four-stroke for five minutes on untreated gasoline to get it warm and listen to the untreated engine sound. The snowblower engine was pretty rough and noisy, with noticeable soot in the exhaust. I then poured a half-can of Seafoam into into the snowblower gas tank, and ran it for another 45 minutes. Sure enough, the rough-running engine smoothed out within 5 minutes, and the exhaust soot noticeably reduced.

After she saw the Touareg and snowblower results, wifey then did the same Seafoam treatment on her 5.4L Ford F-150 gasser pickup. Her throttle response immediately improved within the first 10km of driving, and her idle reduced from a noisy 800 rpm to a quieter 600 rpm. She says that the engine definitely feels smoother after the Seafoam. She did get clouds of white exhaust smoke for the first fifteen minutes, and then the exhaust became invisible again.

I got the Seamfoam from Canadian Tire at $12.99 CAD per can. NAPA here in Alberta has it on sale for $7.50 CAD a can until Oct 31.

If you decide you want to try it on your own TDI injectors, you have at least two different application options: A) run the Seafoam liquifier directly into the live fuel line while the engine is running (two-person job; look for youtube videos to see the process), or B) be lazy like me and just pour it into a partially-full fuel tank and drive as normal.

If you do the latter approach, I recommend getting your tank down to 1/2 full or 1/3rd full, and use two full cans of the product. This increases the Seafoam effective concentration, and should get you decarboning results within the first 30-45 minutes of driving.
 

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I've used in older technology with good results in the past. I'm not convinced that on a CR TDI it would do much. What kind of kms are on the clock of the specimen you are getting this effect on? I can see\understand some slight improvements from the additional lubricity. I can't imagine however that your injectors had carbon buildup on them which was restricting the flow\spray and the massive high pressure wasn't able to "blow out", but then the Seafoam dissolved it. I guess in theory it would be possible that you had carbon buildup on the exhaust valves or the turbo vanes, and the seafoam cleared it up, so maybe what you are describing is not a total placebo effect.

During my prior experiences with it however, it all took place on carb\TB\Port injection setups with high milage or "service use", and when those puppies started to smoke, just about everyone wanted to call the fire department since it wasn't just "a little".
 

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I believe this.. I use seafoam in every new-used care I buy and have always gotten great results. Heck I even seafoam my boat and it makes a huge difference. Typically I put half a can to a full can in the intake and then a full can in the fuel tank.
 

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I can't imagine however that your injectors had carbon buildup on them which was restricting the flow\spray and the massive high pressure wasn't able to "blow out", but then the Seafoam dissolved it. I guess in theory it would be possible that you had carbon buildup on the exhaust valves or the turbo vanes, and the seafoam cleared it up, so maybe what you are describing is not a total placebo effect.
My Treg is at 113,000 kilometers, about 50/50 city/hwy. There are multiple reasons why I believe that it was injector buildup that the Seafoam addressed:

  1. By virtue of the in-tank approach, my Seafoam treatment was performed only on the fueling system up to the point of combustion; after the (diesel charge + seafoam) is combusted, there is no more Seafoam left to treat the exhaust valves or turbo. So, any decarboning results I've achieved had to be between the HPFP and the combustion chamber. I suppose it could have been some carbon buildup in the fuel filter, but that filter is only 500km old.

  2. The heat of high-pressure CR diesel fueling releases asphaltene long-chain molecules from the diesel fuel, which add to other unhelpful compounds like aromatics and olefins. These compounds LOVE to accumulate on metal. By the time it gets to our chamber injectors, the diesel is tens of thousands of psi pressure, which then squirts through little holes the thickness of a human hair.

    233598



  3. Diesel injectors get buildup because of 'nozzle coking'; every time the engine shuts down, unburnt fuel (and asphaltenes, aromatics, olefins) in the injector tips get cooked on like burnt lasagne cheese. And since I've been doing a lot of city driving lately, my engine stops and starts up to 12x per day.

    233599


Here are some articles on the nozzle buildup, asphaltenes, and other carbon fouling in diesels:

  1. https://www.dieselnet.com/tech/engine_fi_nozzle_deposits.php

  2. https://www.innospecinc.com/images/pdf/technical-papers/2011-01-1923-diesel-injector-deposits---an-issue-that-has-evolved-with-engine-technology.pdf

  3. https://www.fuelox.com/2018/03/07/the-new-fuel-contaminent-asphaltenes/

  4. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306261918304719
Here is a SWAT diesel HMMV getting some Seafoam love:

Project Farm does a Seafoam treatment on his old Ford Ranger's injectors:

 

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By virtue of the in-tank approach, my Seafoam treatment was performed only on the fueling system up to the point of combustion; after the (diesel charge + seafoam) is combusted, there is no more Seafoam left to treat the exhaust valves or turbo.
You may want to look at what's under your hood and downstream of your engine. There will be fuel that hits both the exhaust valves and turbo vanes as per my initial comment.
Secondary injection
Two secondary injection processes are carried out to
regenerate a diesel particulate filter. These secondary
injections increase the exhaust gas temperature,
which is necessary to combust the soot particles in the
diesel particulate filter.

So, any decarboning results I've achieved had to be between the HPFP and the combustion chamber. I suppose it could have been some carbon buildup in the fuel filter, but that filter is only 500km old.
Last time I checked, the fuel filter is pre pump\injectors\combustion, so I'm not following how you'd get carbon in it.

Also consider that we are using Piezo-controlled injectors, not mechanical or solenoid valve-controlled once like some of the "tractor" examples you've provided.
This results in the following advantages:
  • Very short switching times
  • Several injections per working cycle are possible
  • Precisely apportionable injection quantities
 
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