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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another write up to help all you guys here. How to replace your rear discs. I assume that you have some basic mechanic skills when you work on your brakes. This is a job that you can do yourself but if you're not sure, pay someone to do the job for you.

At first I tried to replace it in front of my house. This is possible but the challenge is to remove the two big bolts that holds the caliper. I couldn't remove them due to lack of space beneath the car so went to the DIY garage and put the big fellow with his wheels in the air ;)

At first remove your wheels


Brake caliper


Two big bolts that I couldn't remove.




Once on the bridge the bolts came loose quickly.




Before removing the bolts, remove your brake pads first. Disconnect the wire at the plug and discard it or if it's not damaged you can re-use it. I used new ones and of course also new brake pads. To remove your pads, just tap out the holding pins and pull them out.




Caliper removed. Make sure you don't let it hang on the brake lines. Use a tyrap and secure it.


Remove the little bolt that holts the disc and remove your disc.


Fresh Disc. Clean it thoroughly with brake cleaner before put the disc on the car.


Not that hard, just put it on an put in the new bolt to secure it. The little hole at the right side is to adjust your handbrake in case you replace those pads as well. Don't forget to put in a new bolt there also.


Cleaned my caliper and pushed in the pistons with a piece of wood. Watch your brake fluid reservoir that nothing is spilled! When you push back the pistons the fluid level rises. Suck fluid out if necessary and don't spill fluid on your paint. Two new bolts to secure the caliper and slide in the new pads.


Place the (new) wear indicator and pins back in place.


Wheel back on and this side is finished.


One side took me less the 20 minutes. When your finished, check the brake fluid level.

Torque the 2 big bolt at 180Nm and replace them every time you remove them.

Before you drive away, press down your brake pedal a couple of times to "set" the pads. Try to brake gently at the beginning.
 

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Good how-to. Well done.

I see you used that well known and absolutely essential piece of clubtoureg kit - a piece of luber. Even better!
 

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I was interested to see your rear brakes are twin piston, where as my 2008 TDI v6 has four piston callipers.

Stuart..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The principle stays the same.
 

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Do you recall seeing if the new/old rotor was balanced by weight or by machining some of the rotor material away?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I haven't seen that but I guess it's not that important. Because the disk is near the centre of the axle and if there is some imbalance I don't think it's noticeable. I still have two new front discs and will look at them and come back here. Now I'm skiing :)
 

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I did not see it in your steps but you should always check new discs once mounted for run out with a dial. 0.08mm should be your max reading.
That is a step most and even brake shops miss also then wonder why the guy is back in 7000kms with a pulsing brake pedal.

regards
Drag
 

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So realizing this is a older thread. Time to do my rears, I have done the front about four times, so hoping the rear are not that different. Questions I have: 1) dealer doesn't stock the big 14mm triple square bolt and told me they always re-use the bolt??? I have always ordered new front caliper bolts, but am finding the rear difficult to get my hands on. What are others doing?
2)Second question, I assume you have to have the parking brake off in order to remove the disk / drum otherwise it would clamp the rotor onto the knuckle. Can you confirm?
3)Lastly, I have had a brake pad squeak when traveling at slow speeds with my foot off the brake (less than 10mph). I have traced this to the rear left brake, and I have determined it is not the parking brake portion. Anyone use anti-squeal or some form of anti-rattle. This drives me nuts because my foot is not on the pedal when it does it. It also does it more when it is hot out or when I have been in heavy traffic.
 

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When I did my rears I had ordered the Alretta Truck Parts kit from John. e includes all of the hardware necessary. Be preared to fight the rear caliper bolts. I recall using a 1/2 breaker bar and a pipe.
Good luck!
 

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My 2 cents, open the bleeder screw on the caliper (attach a small piece of tube first that can go into a soda bottle) and when you push pistons back into caliper the brake fluid in there does not get pushed back into the system.
Also, should be flushing brake fluid every 2 to 3 years to keep everything clean and working properly.
 

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Update: OK so I talked to someone else at the same dealer and was told the last person was wrong in telling me not to replace the 14mm triple square. So I have four on order and will be replacing them. All in cost to me is $292 including Zimmerman Rotors, PAGID pads, wear sensors, and one time use bolts...not bad considering OEM parts. The shop I was buying my parts tried to sell me Bosch Quiet something pads (mexico) and Miele (sp?) Rotors (China) I passed. Not putting something made in China as the main thing between an oncoming car and my family.
Going to get a socket from Sears Craftsman to work the bolt, don't want to break off the socket in the bolt head...did this once never again using a cheap socket.
 

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A correction to my previous posts: the large triple square bolts are 16M not 14M.
A good socket for those in the US / Canada is Capri Tools 16M 1/2" drive triple square (Amazon), Craftsman doesn't offer this socket. I looked for North American, EU, or even Mexican made sockets, no luck in this size. Even Snap-On's version is made in Taiwan.
This project is now checked off my to-do list, big thanks to the OP.
 

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Great write up. Can you describe how you removed the sensor plug from the bracket? Does that turn out?

Thanks
 

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Great write up. Can you describe how you removed the sensor plug from the bracket? Does that turn out?

Thanks
When i did mine you dont really remove the plug from the bracket it slides out. The housing of the connector stays attached to that metal bracket. I think i just used a little tiny screwdriver to push in a little tab and then pull it out. the new one slides in and snaps in place.

If you look at the new sensor you can kind of see where the tabs are.
 

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Yeah leave in bracket. No need to remove. Flat screwdriver into end of plug to be disconnected, gently pry up, and the plug and socket will disconnect.

I need to figure out socket size for e-brake adjuster cover (in old rotor). Had to re-assemble without plug. Any ideas? Looks like really small triple square?
 

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Follow up - in case anyone needs this

Yeah leave in bracket. No need to remove. Flat screwdriver into end of plug to be disconnected, gently pry up, and the plug and socket will disconnect.

I need to figure out socket size for e-brake adjuster cover (in old rotor). Had to re-assemble without plug. Any ideas? Looks like really small triple square?

The e-brake adjuster cover bolt is a 5 mm triple square (12 point).
 

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Another write up to help all you guys here. How to replace your rear discs. I assume that you have some basic mechanic skills when you work on your brakes. This is a job that you can do yourself but if you're not sure, pay someone to do the job for you.

At first I tried to replace it in front of my house. This is possible but the challenge is to remove the two big bolts that holds the caliper. I couldn't remove them due to lack of space beneath the car so went to the DIY garage and put the big fellow with his wheels in the air ;)

At first remove your wheels


Brake caliper


Two big bolts that I couldn't remove.




Once on the bridge the bolts came loose quickly.




Before removing the bolts, remove your brake pads first. Disconnect the wire at the plug and discard it or if it's not damaged you can re-use it. I used new ones and of course also new brake pads. To remove your pads, just tap out the holding pins and pull them out.




Caliper removed. Make sure you don't let it hang on the brake lines. Use a tyrap and secure it.


Remove the little bolt that holts the disc and remove your disc.


Fresh Disc. Clean it thoroughly with brake cleaner before put the disc on the car.


Not that hard, just put it on an put in the new bolt to secure it. The little hole at the right side is to adjust your handbrake in case you replace those pads as well. Don't forget to put in a new bolt there also.


Cleaned my caliper and pushed in the pistons with a piece of wood. Watch your brake fluid reservoir that nothing is spilled! When you push back the pistons the fluid level rises. Suck fluid out if necessary and don't spill fluid on your paint. Two new bolts to secure the caliper and slide in the new pads.


Place the (new) wear indicator and pins back in place.


Wheel back on and this side is finished.


One side took me less the 20 minutes. When your finished, check the brake fluid level.

Torque the 2 big bolt at 180Nm and replace them every time you remove them.

Before you drive away, press down your brake pedal a couple of times to "set" the pads. Try to brake gently at the beginning.
What tool did you use to remove those bolts with the internal spline?
 

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When i did mine you dont really remove the plug from the bracket it slides out. The housing of the connector stays attached to that metal bracket. I think i just used a little tiny screwdriver to push in a little tab and then pull it out. the new one slides in and snaps in place.

If you look at the new sensor you can kind of see where the tabs are.
I think different years have different brakes, that work quite differently. The main difference in between these models is whether the calipers have pistons on both sides or not, and this makes for very different procedure in changing the pads.
I did the front so far, and mine were much simpler than what was described on the internet (2010 Touareg). No bolts, just pins.
 
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