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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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All other things being equal the rear spring rate does not change the rear axle load. However stiffer springs that reduce rear sag mean all other things are not equal and will generally mean more tow ball weight as the tow ball is higher unless other adjustments are made to counter that.

cheers
Rohan
 

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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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Yes unfortunately Tregs have not attracted much after market modification support from people like ARB and Pedders.

I guess it is because they tend to not be used used much off road. However they are used for towing a lot and a GVM upgrade to increase allowable rear axle load would be useful and I would have thought it would have sufficient market for someone to do it and get it certified.

cheers
Rohan
 

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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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Hey Rohan can you explain the logic behind the tow ball height and the increased tow ball weight? I don’t understand how it affects it.
Currently my rear sags a huge amount and the towball height is lower as a result. When I have my stiffer springs in, I’m hoping it will then lift the towball height to where the caravan is more level rather than nose down. In effect it should get things back to optimal tow ball height and caravan attitude. I was thinking the nose down attitude would put more weight on the towball.
If you have a dual axle van as the towball drops the weight on the tow ball will also reduce somewhat as it puts more load on the van front axle creating a countering torque and reducing the ball weight. Raise the tow ball with stiffer springs and the ball weight will tend to go up. How big the effect depends on the van and its suspension design.

cheers
Rohan
 

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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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The threaded bottom spring seats on the shocks control the ride height by raising and lowering the springs as they rotate versus the shock body and thus raise or lower the rest of the car, from what I can see in the photos. The higher you raise the car the more the shock rod extends versus the shock body that's fixed to the lower suspension arm and the less droop available in the suspension.

I would be checking the droop to ensure I had at least 50mm and preferably 75 mm. I don't have a reference handy for the stock droop but the closer you can get to that the better.

At the rear I would also be checking the bump travel with the caravan on to ensure you have enough bump travel before spring bind or you hit the bump stops

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Rohan
 

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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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Yes thats how you check the droop travel. The spring load is unchanged as the car weighs the same. What will have altered is the spring rate ( higher with the new stiffer springs) spring compression length ( less with the new stiffer springs) and distance to end of shock travel , spring bind and bump stops with the new set up and ride height. These need checking to make sure no problems in bump or droop with spring binding or shocks reaching end of travel before the suspension hits the bump stops
 

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2013 7P Touareg R line V8 4.2 TDI
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Rear axle overload will result in excessive squat at the rear with standard steel suspension This will result in the rear suspension hitting the bump stops more often and harder which may result in some damage depending on how hard and how often. Less of a problem with air suspension as the suspension will stay at a constant height despite the overload until the air pressure reaches its limit. If the rear axle overload is due to tow ball weight or other weight behind the rear axle then the front axle will also lose weight on it, leading to the steering becoming more vague and increased understeer in corners
 
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