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Just put a deposit on a 2007 v6tdi Treg. It has the VW horizontal (2") towbar installed but no tongue included. I have 2 spare HR 2 inch tongues at home.

I haven't taken delivery yet but was interested to know if the HR inserts will fit the VW bar. The hole in the towbar seems further back than on the HR that was on my old Pajero.
 

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Just put a deposit on a 2007 v6tdi Treg. It has the VW horizontal (2") towbar installed but no tongue included. I have 2 spare HR 2 inch tongues at home.

I haven't taken delivery yet but was interested to know if the HR inserts will fit the VW bar. The hole in the towbar seems further back than on the HR that was on my old Pajero.
Correct Craig in that the hole is different in dimension from centre of towball/bolt to centre of hitch holding pin (or bolt).... and yes, the Hayman Reese fits the VW (both are 50mm from memory). I have one from a Lexus RX400 and one from a Prado and I forget which one I used but the it fitted fine - I was looking for a "better" corresponding height with my camper trailer as opposed to the VW one that came with the bar. You can redrill to suit as long as it is not too close to the existing hole. IMPORTANT - it must be rated to match what you have installed if you intend to tow at the max rating? Cheers Paul.
 

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Just put a deposit on a 2007 v6tdi Treg. It has the VW horizontal (2") towbar installed but no tongue included. I have 2 spare HR 2 inch tongues at home.

I haven't taken delivery yet but was interested to know if the HR inserts will fit the VW bar. The hole in the towbar seems further back than on the HR that was on my old Pajero.
if you haven't already read the buying a used Touareg thread, do so now before collection. the link is below.. .
 

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What Paul said x 2
 

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While I understand the towbar tongue hanging out from the towbar in what is a excessive amount you need just to stop and think for a minute.
While drilling the tongue with a new hole for the retainer pin is easy you are probably making a change to a certified component. This is a critical joint between you and your caravan etc. Failure not only risks your life but the life of other road users.
A bit like the comment from others about you don't skimp with brakes.

Just a comment only and in no way support for either choice.

regards
Drag
 

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While I understand the towbar tongue hanging out from the towbar in what is a excessive amount you need just to stop and think for a minute.
While drilling the tongue with a new hole for the retainer pin is easy you are probably making a change to a certified component. This is a critical joint between you and your caravan etc. Failure not only risks your life but the life of other road users.
A bit like the comment from others about you don't skimp with brakes.

Just a comment only and in no way support for either choice.

regards
Drag
Drag, very valid points and agree that drilling an additional hole in the hitch (the 50mm SHS/square hollow section) may nullify the certification without approval from the manufacturer. However, as long as you drill the same size hole as the existing hole and not close to the existing hole, nothing has changed. It is very easy to prove that the total area which would tear in tension in the event of a failure has not changed... and you could have an engineer certify this (or manufacturers approval).

Drilling an additional hole does not affect any bending forces as it is restrained within the receiving hitch, the only forces that can act upon (and does act upon) the "remaining" area top and bottom of the hole are tensile or compressive. And the only one of significance is the tensile force, which in the event of failure will tear the material above and below the hole. But that will not happen... the pin will fail in shear long before the hitch material tears/fails.

Notwithstanding all that, and as mentioned previous, the hitch must be rated to match the towbar assembly if towing at the max rating. I mentioned that because although the hitches look the same, the material thicknesses and welding can be different and other hitches may be rated for lesser capacity... eg. 1.5, 2.0 tonne etc.

Craig, if you are concerned, then simply go to Hayman Reese and buy a new hitch to suit your rated towbar assembly as fitted. Or if it is a Hayman Reese hitch you are thinking of using, email or call them and get their approval in writing for the additional hole - it won't be a problem (as long as it is not too close to the existing hole). And in any case, always use safety chains and rated shackles - they are there for a purpose :).

Cheers Paul.
 

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For the record, the previous owner of my Touareg (evaddirB) had a Pajero 'tongue' with the vehicle. I use this when towing small 6x4 etc trailers.

When towing the caravan or the car trailer, I use the Eaz-lift system (with the 'bars' attached when towing the caravan).
 

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Drag, very valid points and agree that drilling an additional hole in the hitch (the 50mm SHS/square hollow section) may nullify the certification without approval from the manufacturer. However, as long as you drill the same size hole as the existing hole and not close to the existing hole, nothing has changed. It is very easy to prove that the total area which would tear in tension in the event of a failure has not changed... and you could have an engineer certify this (or manufacturers approval).

Drilling an additional hole does not affect any bending forces as it is restrained within the receiving hitch, the only forces that can act upon (and does act upon) the "remaining" area top and bottom of the hole are tensile or compressive. And the only one of significance is the tensile force, which in the event of failure will tear the material above and below the hole. But that will not happen... the pin will fail in shear long before the hitch material tears/fails.

Notwithstanding all that, and as mentioned previous, the hitch must be rated to match the towbar assembly if towing at the max rating. I mentioned that because although the hitches look the same, the material thicknesses and welding can be different and other hitches may be rated for lesser capacity... eg. 1.5, 2.0 tonne etc.

Craig, if you are concerned, then simply go to Hayman Reese and buy a new hitch to suit your rated towbar assembly as fitted. Or if it is a Hayman Reese hitch you are thinking of using, email or call them and get their approval in writing for the additional hole - it won't be a problem (as long as it is not too close to the existing hole). And in any case, always use safety chains and rated shackles - they are there for a purpose :).

Cheers Paul.
Hey Paul
Yes in the practical world drilling a new hole in most cases would be fine totally agree.
Getting it re-certified could be done but would probably be cost prohibitive.
Just pointing out things like this in the legal/insurance/ safety world need to be put on the table.
I am sure there are lots of bigger issues out there on the road on other vehicles just waiting to be bite people than a redrilled towbar tongue.

Regards
Drag
 

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Drag, very valid points and agree that drilling an additional hole in the hitch (the 50mm SHS/square hollow section) may nullify the certification without approval from the manufacturer. However, as long as you drill the same size hole as the existing hole and not close to the existing hole, nothing has changed. It is very easy to prove that the total area which would tear in tension in the event of a failure has not changed... and you could have an engineer certify this (or manufacturers approval). Drilling an additional hole does not affect any bending forces as it is restrained within the receiving hitch, the only forces that can act upon (and does act upon) the "remaining" area top and bottom of the hole are tensile or compressive. And the only one of significance is the tensile force, which in the event of failure will tear the material above and below the hole. But that will not happen... the pin will fail in shear long before the hitch material tears/fails. Notwithstanding all that, and as mentioned previous, the hitch must be rated to match the towbar assembly if towing at the max rating. I mentioned that because although the hitches look the same, the material thicknesses and welding can be different and other hitches may be rated for lesser capacity... eg. 1.5, 2.0 tonne etc. Craig, if you are concerned, then simply go to Hayman Reese and buy a new hitch to suit your rated towbar assembly as fitted. Or if it is a Hayman Reese hitch you are thinking of using, email or call them and get their approval in writing for the additional hole - it won't be a problem (as long as it is not too close to the existing hole). And in any case, always use safety chains and rated shackles - they are there for a purpose :). Cheers Paul.
what a load of cods wallop. Of course drilling a hole changes the properties. The changes include tensile and compressive strength ratings of the material with which it has been applied to. Even things like tempering from heat checking need to be taken into account.
 

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what a load of cods wallop. Of course drilling a hole changes the properties. The changes include tensile and compressive strength ratings of the material with which it has been applied to. Even things like tempering from heat checking need to be taken into account.
in the context of will it cause a failure with the new hole as the root cause ... then no, the hole makes no difference at all. even the pub test would say that.
the world's gone mad with correctness!!
 
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Just to clarify, see the attached photo. Craig is talking about drilling an additional hole in the hitch, not the tongue (assume the red hole is the additional hole required). The hitch slides into a receiver, so there are no bending moments/forces at the hole. The hitch can only fail "at or around the drilled hole" by way of a tensile tear away failure due to a reduced material cross-sectional area, but that does not change if there's 1 or 3 holes... it would fail at "one" of the locations around only "one" of the holes (assuming the hole is not drilled too close to the existing hole, otherwise it could then shear the bridge of material between those holes). Tensile and compressive forces are generated from towing, braking etc and the maximum rating remains for eg. 3500kgs.

Craig, if you want to use your existing HR hitch, talk with Hayman Reese for your own safety, comfort and confidence. Drag raises very valid points and I'm sure one quick call will give you all the answers you need.
 

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The statement was that "nothing has changed". I called baloney on that because it has. "Not too close to the other hole" is how far? Is 3mm ok or 11? Common sense is not always common therefore statements need to be carefully considered as someone could end up strapping 3 1/2 tonne to it (which is a fack load of weight and forces) with mum and bubs in the car.

That's why certification exists.
 

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As a Structural Engineer - Aust standard AS4100 considers the minimum pitch for holes in members carrying axial loads to be 2.5 times the hole diameter. Since the only axial loads result from a hit from behind, heavy braking, acceleration, pulling van out of a bog or climbing very steep hill. I cannot see that braking or acceleration would inflict anywhere near what the tongue, hitch pin, or hitch with additional hole can safely take.
Given that materials (pin and hitch) have not changed in size or grade the only additional failure mode introduced is shearing of material between the 2 holes (unless of course the new hole is towards the back of the hitch and is close to the end). Given that this shearing requires an axial load, it really is not an issue if minimum pitch distance is observed.
The hitch is very unlikely to be the limiting component in the tow bar design.
 
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