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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
We just took delivery of our Silver '05 Lux 2.5TDI yesterday. Only has 104,000klms on it with full VW service history and hardly a mark on it. Looks and drives like a new car. :)
I've spent a couple of hours going over it today checking out what it does and doesn't do. Was a bit worried that I couldn't find the trailer plug for a while until I popped open the little panel above the hitch :). The only thing that doesn't seem to work is the power socket on left hand side of the centre console...tested it and found no power. I've checked fuses 1, 3 and 5 but all seem ok. Not a big deal but I might need to look into it later on. There was no compressor for the space saver but that's ok as I have one already from my previous 4x4...likewise my fire extinguisher fitted right in.
I'll be fitting an LED light bar on one of those number plate brackets soon, as well as fitting my UHF radio so no doubt I'll be asking around as to the best way to go about it.
For now though...I might just go for a drive ;)
 

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Do take time to read this thread carefully - lots of useful info and things likely to go wrong:

Buying a used Touareg. What to look for. - myTreg forums

Key thing on your engine - the EXACT RIGHT OIL - VW spec 505.01 or 506.01 to avoid premature camshaft lobe wear. Unless you know with 1,000% certainty, change the oil and filter ASAP.

Use croc clips on your tyre compressor to run it off the jump terminals under the bonnet NOT any of the cigarette type sockets in the car unless you want a fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that. I didn't realise the oil choice was so critical but having since read up on it I can see that it is. Interestingly, the 2nd to last service in my book did actually mention that the oil used was VW Spec 506.01. The problem is that I requested the dealership I purchased from do a service before I took delivery and I'm unsure of what oil they used....my money is on them using the cheapest they could get away with. I'll give them a call after Christmas and find out for sure but I don't hold out much hope of them using the correct spec.
Which brings me to my next question....Where will I find 506.01 spec oil in Australia? I've done a little research and haven't really found anything definite...somebody must have an idea though.

As for the compressor connection...yes...I've used them many times before and wouldn't even consider owning one that used a cigarette type plug for power..

Cheers
Chris A.
 

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Ref the compressor, I thought I might be teaching you to suck eggs [and it's probably already Christmas Day for you now, not Easter!!].

Look at member dragline1750 content - he's your [relatively in Oz terms] local R5/V10 guru!

Club Touareg Forums - View Profile: dragline1570
 

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It's too cold to go out, so I've been cleaning the basement of my house all day. Now I still have cabin fever, even though now the basement is a lot cleaner. Elkhart, IN is home, but sometimes the winters here seem interminable, and it's only January. I looked onto Club Touareg and was scrolling through the forums, and I saw this thread "G'day from Melbourne," and I thought about how it's summer in Australia. Tell me, Australian denizens of Club Touareg, what is it like to have Christmas and New Years in the summer? Is it as much fun as it sounds?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
G'day from Australia :)

Christmas in Australia....BBQ...Beach...Camping...Sun (lots of it).... These are the things that immediately spring to mind when thinking of Christmas in Australia. Of course, not everyone gets to enjoy them, plenty of people still have to work during the holiday period. For those that can take time off it's the time most of us spend visiting family and friends and basically having a good time.
December is also the end of the school year in Australia so families get to spend a LOT of time together usually. The school holidays (vacation/summer break) is usually around 6 or 7 weeks, so most people generally plan their vacation time around this period. For the 1st few days of the break the roads are pretty busy with everyone heading off to the beaches, holiday homes, camping/caravan parks etc.
In most parts of Australia at this time of year it can get very hot...but that's usually a pretty good excuse to kick back with a BBQ and plenty of cold drinks ;)
We still do the Xmas tree and gift giving thing...and we still have Christmas dinner with the family although a lot of people settle for seafood and salads rather than roast turkeys and hams.

I spent one Christmas in Germany a while back...lots of snow and ice and all the traditional things associated with Christmas. It was fun but I do prefer our more laid back approach to the season :)
I also spent Christmas in Texas a few years ago as well, once again it was fun but there is no place like home.
 

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Thanks, Chris! Christmas in Australia sounds amazing, especially with a seafood dinner. I am in a landlocked part of the US, where seafood is a real treat. I heard that, in Italy, people eat something called the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Is Australian Christmas seafood anything like that?
 

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Not sure about the Feast of the Seven Fishes..we're not that organised :) The usual deal at our place is maybe a smoked ham...possibly a pork roast and associated veg..... plenty of prawns (shrimp)...oysters...possibly a lobster or 2 and occasionally a salmon done in the bbq. As my wife is Filipino we also have plenty of rice and Filipino dishes as well.
We usually have plenty of leftovers for family and friends to take home with them. :)
 

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Interesting thread seeing how others celebrate Christmas through food.

Mainland European countries, where the Roman Catholic religion is to the fore, seem to observe Christmas Eve for their main family meal.

In the UK, it's still Christmas Day for a good blow out.

Personally I prefer forerib of beef over the traditional turkey, both of which, and I suspect I may be unique [in the true sense of that word] in this respect in the UK, I roast in a charcoal fuelled Weber kettle barbecue which leaves the kitchen clear for lots of roast potatoes, and, in the case of the beef, a couple of Yorkshire puddings!



Yorkshire pud:



A seven bird roast - a deboned turkey stuffed with deboned duck, pheasant, chicken, pigeon, partridge and guinea fowl - is pretty tasty too! This one weighs in at around 20 lbs / 9 kilos.

 

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.... I looked onto Club Touareg and was scrolling through the forums, and I saw this thread "G'day from Melbourne," and I thought about how it's summer in Australia. Tell me, Australian denizens of Club Touareg, what is it like to have Christmas and New Years in the summer? Is it as much fun as it sounds?
Well depends on what you define as fun!
Here in Adelaide Christmas Day in 2016 was a tad warm and bright - 41.5C if I remember correctly - with the sun burning brightly kaboom

Far too hot for turkey et al. Instead we had mostly seafood and cold salads, along with a fair amount of cold liquid refreshment to keep hydrated of course! For our UK friends these are the sort if days when you understand why beer is drunk cold, veery cold. The Waeco chest cooler was stocked and set to 4C but then turned down to 2C to get the replacements colder quicker:surprise: as they were consumed at a fairly rapid pace.

Seafood was Smoked Salmon, tomatoes stuffed with tuna, lobster tails, natural oysters and scallops. Didn't bother with the prawns nut kept them for Boxing Day, to watch the cricket with0:)
Our UK fiends will understand cricket, I doubt there is enough space here to explain this game to those not brought up with it!)

Its not usually this hot here though, more usually low 30's and high 20's C at Christmas which allows a lot more freedom to do things. Many go to the beach in the afternoon/evening for a stroll and swim, on the white fine sand beaches not rocks like at Brighton England! The sun sets around 8.30pm, and I find the evening to be the most pleasant part of the day, winding down after the hustle and bustle.

In January and February is when things heat up for real, so if travelling down here and you don't like heat (over 38C or 100F) avoid this time. I guess it is what you get used to as well, at least in Adelaide the humidity is generally low, which makes the heat easier to take for us used to it.
 

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Cricket....for the un-initiated

You have two sides, one out in the field and one in.

Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in.

There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out.

When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game
 

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All totally understandable, but you failed to mention silly mid-on and silly mid-off, the wicket keeper who doesn't mow the grass, googlies that are nowt to do with Google, no balls that have nothing to do with castration, wides that have no connection with man-spreading, and LBW.
 

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Let alone the catchers in slips,
bowling maidens over (a good thing that)
a wicket maiden (an even better thing)
fine leg,
square leg,
leg slip,
the backward square leg, (a bit slow that one)
point (what is the point?),
ducks, and golden ducks,
yorkers, (no not porkers and done outside Yorkshire)
bouncers, (not at the nightclub)
the man in gully,
the man in covers, (not to be confused with the covers which are brought on by the groundsmen who are neither players on either team nor umpires)
the third man (usually a bowler resting at third man)
swing bowling (Mr Miller was good at that - Keith that is)
the hat trick (three wickets - not to be confused with the three stumps that make up a wicket which when broken by a ball bowled by the bowler is a wicket - though a wicket can also be taken by a catch or a stumping or a run out)
the batsman is out if he handles the ball, (but is often seen handling his own with the box for protection)

Oh the list is endless.

But to sum up I think BBC Test Match Special had one of the highlights of cricket commentary ever, when describing a Test Match between England and the West Indies,

As they returned to the play the commentator was heard to say

"the batsman Holding the bowlers Willey!"


Followed by much noise as all commentators were unable to speak.
 

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Today I Learned

Thanks for the introduction to the sport of cricket. Wow! The things I learn on this forum. First I learned a bunch of British insults (wasters, etc.), and now this. To think that I live in a very un-cosmopolitan part of the U.S., that I am that a few years ago I was working as a house painter in Elkhart, IN and had never met anyone from outside the U.S. Besides cricket, what is another thing that you wish Americans knew about Australia?
 

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Thanks for the introduction to the sport of cricket. Wow! The things I learn on this forum. First I learned a bunch of British insults (wasters, etc.), and now this. To think that I live in a very un-cosmopolitan part of the U.S., that I am that a few years ago I was working as a house painter in Elkhart, IN and had never met anyone from outside the U.S. Besides cricket, what is another thing that you wish Americans knew about Australia?
you asked...you get get :grin2:


 

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Rugby. 15 blokes, one of whom is a hooker, trying to take out 14 other blokes and their hooker whilst kicking and handling an oval ball with which they score points.


Also known as rugger with players sometimes known as rugger buggers though there's (normally) no buggering.
 

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Thanks, Steve and Noobytoogy. Rugger buggers. My vocabulary keeps growing. It's encouraging to hear that Australia isn't overrun by man-eating crocodiles, but I guess that stereotype only makes as much sense as being afraid to go to Orlando, FL because of the alligators. It's a little disturbing that the hole in the ozone layer is right above Australia, though.
 

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I used to live next to a house on the outskirts of Oxford, England, where the previous owner was the university professor, a guy called Dobson, who discovered the ozone layer was in trouble and he and his students used to measure it daily from an old wooden shed at the top of the garden! That shed is now in the London Science Museum.

Here's Dobson:

http://www.theozonehole.com/dobsonunit.htm
 

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That is so cool that you used to live right next to the house from which the hole in the ozone layer was measured. One more question about Melbourne. How is the cockroach situation? I like sunshine, even if it is shining in through a hole in the ozone layer, but I don't like roaches one little bit. I always say I could never move to Florida unless it gets its roach situation under control. The creepy animal that keeps me from packing up and leaving this Midwestern winter behind is not the lizards or the alligators; it's the roaches.
 
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