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Had the Toyo's installed yesterday at the local NTB. They didn't have a RFB so I told them to line up the yellow dots to the stems. No vibrations @ 80 mph so that's good enough for me.
What year Treg were these for? Did you have to follow the VW TSB mounting them on the vehicle? No steering wheel shake is great. Maybe RFB is for tires that are more problematic. Gives me hope with the Toyo's. Can't wait for mine to get here (this Thursday).
 

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I called my local Discount, they have the Nokian WRG3 for $215 each. They said the $102.39 was a bridge too far. They suggested I order the tires online and bring them in for mounting.

If I end up with the Nokian I will be using them as a year round tire. The wife puts about 7K miles on the Touareg annually.
If you go to the Discount Tire website and use the price comparison button someone from the company will get back to you and let you know if they can match it, or beat it. Then they give you the option to set up having them shipped to your local Discount Tire store to be mounted.
I ultimately ordered a pair of Toyo's in the link below. As Suzy1052 and VWBob have verified they are a good tire and mount up with no problems. Of course I already have a dedicated Winter setup that will go on right before the season starts.

 

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What year Treg were these for? Did you have to follow the VW TSB mounting them on the vehicle? No steering wheel shake is great. Maybe RFB is for tires that are more problematic. Gives me hope with the Toyo's. Can't wait for mine to get here (this Thursday).
2016 lux. I had my daughter take it in friday so I'm pretty certain they were installed as you would on a normal vehicle. I knew it would be useless to try to relay something like a tsb to a teenager and then to a service rep at a cookie cutter tire chain lol. I took a chance and it worked out so the Toyo's must be a well constructed tire and made in the USA was a plus ! Another thing I was quoted 120.00 plus tax over the phone but they only charged her 63 so all together it was 590.00.
 

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So I received my Toyo's today. First thing I checked was the manufacture date. They are as follows.
N1M3618, 2VP1219, 2VP2019, 2VP2019.
So it appears the oldest one was manufactured in the first week of Sept. 2018, the rest in 2019.
All say made in the USA. Next step is to get them mounted. So yellow dots at valve stems? I'm thinking of skipping the RFB with these as no one around here seems to know how to properly based on my past experiences.
 

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My Toyo's were mounted with the Yellow Dot at the valve stem and then balanced on a RFB, none of the tires needed to be moved/rotated on rim after initial spin to determine weight needed to balance because RF #'s were all low.

I've got a few 1K miles on them now, smooth as silk and quiet, handling was a little weird first couple hundred miles entering turns but tires seem to have settled in.
 

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I went the conservative route and ordered a set of the Pirelli Scoprion Verde All Season Plus II from the local Discount Tire store. I’ve gotten enough bad tires over the years that I’m willing to pay more to have a local operation on the hook rather than dealing with an internet vendor if there is a problem. I went with the stock size Pirelli because I like the way the car drives with them and I was concerned that the Nokian WRG3 wouldn’t handle Phoenix summer heat well, we go there on occasion when it’s 110+ degrees. I’m giving up the better winter traction of the Nokian, but the Pirelli isn’t that far behind the Bridgestone I was considering. A 10% rebate and $70 back from Pirelli gets it down to $1200 out the door with road hazard certs.
 

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Unless you have the opportunity to have 2 sets of rims/tires you have to decide what your priority is if you will be driving in both winter and summer conditions, the Pirelli's sound like a smart choice !
 

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Over MANY years, I've found that tires are like wine & women - the CHEAPER the better! When you pay for a name brand, you are paying for a name brand. They are ALL the same as far as quality is concerned.
 

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Over MANY years, I've found that tires are like wine & women - the CHEAPER the better! When you pay for a name brand, you are paying for a name brand. They are ALL the same as far as quality is concerned.
I would say that is true for the most part. The cheapest brands today are as good as name brands 10-15 years ago however when I worked for the largest US tire distributor back in the early 2000's we sold (at a very good clip) some brands that I wouldn't put on a Murray riding mower. When I was was a kid my dad would always complain about cheap Japanese crap and in turn I would complain to my kids about cheap Chinese junk so my question is who's next ?
 

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I would say that is true for the most part. The cheapest brands today are as good as name brands 10-15 years ago however when I worked for the largest US tire distributor back in the early 2000's we sold (at a very good clip) some brands that I wouldn't put on a Murray riding mower. When I was was a kid my dad would always complain about cheap Japanese crap and in turn I would complain to my kids about cheap Chinese junk so my question is who's next ?
Like when I was giving my parents a hard time about eating something, they'd say "Eat your dinner. Don't you know there are starving people in Japan?" :D
 

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I would say that is true for the most part. The cheapest brands today are as good as name brands 10-15 years ago however when I worked for the largest US tire distributor back in the early 2000's we sold (at a very good clip) some brands that I wouldn't put on a Murray riding mower. When I was was a kid my dad would always complain about cheap Japanese crap and in turn I would complain to my kids about cheap Chinese junk so my question is who's next ?
The thing I find is when a shop is balancing/RFB tires that aren't the major brands they're used to they'll claim the tires are crap if they can't get them to balance or get low RFB #'s. IMO it's actually the installer that doesn't take their time to do the job properly. It's easier for them to blame anything else but themselves.
 

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The thing I find is when a shop is balancing/RFB tires that aren't the major brands they're used to they'll claim the tires are crap if they can't get them to balance or get low RFB #'s. IMO it's actually the installer that doesn't take their time to do the job properly. It's easier for them to blame anything else but themselves.
The thing I find is when a shop is balancing/RFB tires that aren't the major brands they're used to they'll claim the tires are crap if they can't get them to balance or get low RFB #'s. IMO it's actually the installer that doesn't take their time to do the job properly. It's easier for them to blame anything else but themselves.
The thing I find is when a shop is balancing/RFB tires that aren't the major brands they're used to they'll claim the tires are crap if they can't get them to balance or get low RFB #'s. IMO it's actually the installer that doesn't take their time to do the job properly. It's easier for them to blame anything else but themselves.
That's crazy. There is a certain amount of off-center inch-ounces of mass. If you place the same amount of mass 180 degrees from it, it balances. It is not rocket science. Now, if you have an out-of-round tire, it can still be balance out, but it would "feel" like an unbalance situation, but you likely won't feel it unless it is really bad, such as tread separation.
 

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Over MANY years, I've found that tires are like wine & women - the CHEAPER the better! They are ALL the same as far as quality is concerned.
Strongly disagree with all that...... can't comment on the women section for my own safety.....
But, when it comes to tires, get a top brand that has been specifically developed for a certain use (on or off road, track, snow, mud, etc) and then do the same with a copy cat version of it that uses the same mold (or similar) and looks similar as far as specs\tread pattern, size, etc.

You will quickly realize that compound, construction methods, and all the other "hidden stuff" is very important to the tire's performance.

I'm not saying that the cost is necessarily justified, but there are significant differences in terms of the products. (IMHO)
 

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RFB isn't the magic cure all, you need to have a rim that is round and a tire that is also round but that is not always the case so you need to be able to counter the high spot of the rim to the high spot of the tire to improve the ability of the combination to spin at speed with no or minimal vibration.
If the RFB machine detects a high RF # it give a recommendation to change the position of the tire on the rim in an effort to minimize the out of roundness that is being detected. No matter how good the shop and technician are if the RF # is high after all attempts to change tire position on rim to minimize out of roundness have been attempted there is nothing more to do. It is either a bad rim or a bad tire.
You can get out of round tires with major brands or the inexpensive offshore brands, IMO the major brands do a better QC of their tires and don't put tires into the distribution channel that most likely won't drive smoothly at high speeds on vehicles. When a tire manufacturer sends their tires to an auto manufacturer plant to be used on a new car you can bet they have QC'd them to a roundness standard set by the auto manufacturer, doesn't matter if it is a major tire company or some of the lesser known brands showing up on new cars you see now. And, you can be certain the rims they get manufactured for them are required to be to a high roundness standard too. In addition if you see a new car before it is prepped at the dealer there is a sticker on the rim and tire that the automated tire mounting equipment with a machine vision system they use at factory can detect those markings and matches them during the mounting process, optimum mounting position for rim and tire has already been determined which is what RFB does after tire is mounted to the rim.
Buying tires online and taking to a shop for mounting has the associated risk that if they don't run smooth it is ultimately your problem if it ends up being a bad tire, shop only provided you the service and not the product so why should they put effort into getting manufacturer to replace a bad tire ?
I bought a set of Milestar tires for my Passat and 1 of them had a 30+ RF # after mounting, contacted Milestar US operations and had me buy a new tire through Amazon so I could remove suspect tire from rim on car and send back to them. They determined it was bad (out of round pass spec) and sent me a check to cover cost of replacement tire. Huge PIA !

A tire can be perfectly balanced but that doesn't mean it will be smooth driving down the road if it is not round......
 

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Strongly disagree with all that...... can't comment on the women section for my own safety.....
But, when it comes to tires, get a top brand that has been specifically developed for a certain use (on or off road, track, snow, mud, etc) and then do the same with a copy cat version of it that uses the same mold (or similar) and looks similar as far as specs\tread pattern, size, etc.

You will quickly realize that compound, construction methods, and all the other "hidden stuff" is very important to the tire's performance.

I'm not saying that the cost is necessarily justified, but there are significant differences in terms of the products. (IMHO)
I got some OTSU tires for $85 each for my BMW X5. They are they EXACT size as the Touareg. I bought 5 (one spare, even though BMW had a mini spare), and when towing our RV trailer, I kept it in the trailer storage compartment. We towed all the way up to UP of MI and Manitoba after that. I was concerned, as trailer was at maximum tow capacity and tongue weight, and rear wheels by far had more weight on them than the front. Did not have a bit of problems with those tires!

Still have the spare. When I need new tires for Touareg, I'll buy three matching OTSUs, and be glad to get of these noisy Michelins it came with. Should have a much smoother ride! :D
 

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^^^^ I don't even follow what you are trying to say......
Obviously I would hope that you purchased the same size tires... no one ever said that there are no other brands that offer the "Touareg's size".
Right off the start, I'm willing to bet that your cheap tires are not the same Tread\Traction\Temp\Speed\Load rating as the OEM units, and this is assuming that we are talking about All Season tires already.

The only specifics that you've provided in your deduction, is BRANDS and size, which is such a broad statement that it's ridiculous.

What are you comparing? It sure doesn't sound like apples to apples.
 

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Update :
Firstly I want to say thank you to VWBob and Suzy1052 for recommending the Toyo Open Country tires, and the advice and results of installation.
I had the Toyo's installed today. I asked them to install them with the yellow dot @ the valve stem position and never mentioned anything about the VW TSB.
I took the vehicle for a beer run on the same stretch of road where usually have the SWS the worse. Not so much as a vibration from the steering wheel all the way up to 85MPH. So much better driving my Treg now. I couldn't be happier.
 
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