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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone else get blocked valves and blown fuses when the temperature drops below -12 C?

I asked my dealer to flush the system with nitrogen, which they at first refused to do. After some discussion they agreed to do so, at least they said they flushed it. I am suspecting they just topped it.

Will the system on a T3 suck in ambient air as the T1 did? I believed the T3 used a closed loop, and that there should be no condensation in the system. I suspect a previous repair was done with compressed air and not nitrogen.
 

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I may be wrong so it will need others to confirm one way or t'other, but I thought there was a condenser/drier in the system somewhere?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
From SSP 469

"The air for the compressor is supplied via the air filter in the engine compartment. The air is drawn in and cleaned via the silencer/filter. The air is released via a separate line."

"The air supply unit consists of:
- the compressor unit with electric motor, compressor, air drier, silencer with air filter, pneumatic release valve with maximum pressure limitation (pressure limiting valve),
- the solenoid valve block with the control valves for each air spring damper and the solenoid release valve."

"The system (air suspension system) is refilled in service with nitrogen using the connection provided on the pressure accumulator."

So, it has a drier and use ambient air after the nitrogen gets lost. Need to take a dive into ElsaWin and see if it can be replaced or dried.

From ElsaWin:

"Compressor - Cannot be repaired"

And thats all ElsaWin will tell me about the compressor.

ETKA and google next.

Part Number for the compressor is: 7P0 698 007 B
 

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The original compressor has rebuild kits available. The typical problem is the ring around the piston needs replacement. Most kits sell the dryer kit bundled with the ring repair kit, but you can get a dryer kit separate.

Note: I don't know if this kit will fit a 2011, but it is a start. It appears to have two felt air filters and the dryer beads.


www.amazon.com/SUSPENSION-COMPRESSOR-FILTRATION-45-FILTER/dp/B06XH4FHMP
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the link nickyt. I am considering buying two of these sets, and have some filt at hand in case the diameter is larger.
 

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The T3 system is closed, it normally should never have to draw in outside air. The reservoir and air bags are charged with dry nitrogen. The only time your system would be drawing in outside air (oxygen) would be if you had a leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The T3 system is closed, it normally should never have to draw in outside air. The reservoir and air bags are charged with dry nitrogen. The only time your system would be drawing in outside air (oxygen) would be if you had a leak.
According to SSP 469 a temperature difference can make the system fill with air as well.

"The pressure accumulator is filled if the pressure in the system has changed due to leaks or temperature differences. If the pressure in the system rises above a certain value due to an increase in temperature, the air is released to the outside. The pressure accumulator capacity is 6.2 litre"

And we have had a difference of at least 65 degrees C the last year. But the need to refill should happen at the lower end of the scale where the actual water content in the air should be low, but not low enough.

Is there a way to tell if the system is refilling? Haven't noticed any dropped corners nor excessive use of the compressor.
 

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You can view the status of the complete air system with VCDS. You can view individual bag pressure, reservoir pressure, and standby pressure. IIRC, the reservoir is charged around 180-200psi, which is much higher than the bags will ever have in them. The compressor is only capable of perhaps 130psi max. If VCDS says your pressures are under 140-ish, you have a leak. Therefore, if you have your compressor drawing in outside air, you have a leak.

If it were my vehicle and I lived in a cold climate such that you do, I would have the dealer completely drain and re-charge the system with dry nitrogen. Moisture WILL kill the air suspension system. You can also charge the system yourself with a dry nitrogen tank, pressure gauge and valve, and the T10157/1 adapter tool (this is what I did).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You can view the status of the complete air system with VCDS. You can view individual bag pressure, reservoir pressure, and standby pressure. IIRC, the reservoir is charged around 180-200psi, which is much higher than the bags will ever have in them. The compressor is only capable of perhaps 130psi max. If VCDS says your pressures are under 140-ish, you have a leak. Therefore, if you have your compressor drawing in outside air, you have a leak.

If it were my vehicle and I lived in a cold climate such that you do, I would have the dealer completely drain and re-charge the system with dry nitrogen. Moisture WILL kill the air suspension system. You can also charge the system yourself with a dry nitrogen tank, pressure gauge and valve, and the T10157/1 adapter tool (this is what I did).
I did just check, 10.2 bar in the accumulator. Which is about 140 PSI. So I am down on pressure.

But how does this work? If the Accumulator is 200 PSI, and any use of that pressure will be lost as nothing can get it high enough not refill the accumulator. It's a backup of sorts then? Or designed to slowly be used up until next service?
 

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Hopefully someone knows the answer to iSagen's above questions. I will throw in another thought which might be helpful.

So, are there any dryer beads in the later gen air suspension?

If so, it would be good to replace them with fresh before recharging with nitrogen. An old trick, if you can not get new Desiccant is to dry the old Desiccant in an oven at about 210 degrees.


Also, here are a few links in case someone is not already knowedgeable in desiccants.

dryingbeads.org/?page_id=72

Drying beads® ... The beads will continue to absorb water until all of their pores are filled, up to 20 to 25% of their initial weight. ... ... ...The beads can subsequently be removed and regenerated separately by heating at >200°C for 3-4 hours to release the absorbed water.

theworkshopcompressor.com/learn/compressed-air-systems/compressed-air-dryer/desiccant-compressed-air-dryer/
 
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