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Discussion Starter #1
See a great deal on a 2007 4.2L (mega loaded) with higher miles (almost 140K). I was expected to see this in my budget since the FSI don't have a timing belt but then I read 1001 articles on carbon build up on the intake exhaust valve for most FSI engines...and at least one websits said the Audi R8 4.2L get it bad...boo!

This Egg has had only two owners and the last one for about 6 years and all maintenance done at the Vw dealer that is selling it. They have done a nice amount of work to get it ready for sale (prop shaft, start button, got missing tools from kit!, all fluids, ect).

But no mention of inspecting or correcting carbon build up.

1. Are any of the dealers doing inspection and correction of carbon for a fee? I see it entails pulling intake manifold and media blasting.
2. Are a lot on here reporting issues with carbon or it hit or miss?

Any comments appreciated as I continue to research this vehicle and engine combo.
 

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My experiences with FSI motors and carbon build up...

I had a 2007 A4 2.0T that had an APR Stage 3 kit from 30k to 120k miles. I never had the intake manifold off, to do an actual visual inspection on the valves. But, I had an 034 Catch Can setup and dual nozzle water/meth setup. Right around 100k miles, I had the BG Intake Valve service performed, which is basically spraying their chemicals into the intake tract, while the car is running. I never saw any performance gains from such a process. But I'm pretty confident that there was some substantial buildup.

I now have a 2008 Touareg with the 4.2 FSI. I got it at 50k miles and it now has 60k miles. Right around 55k, I picked up 2 cans of CRC Intake Valve cleaner and ran them according to the directions. I didn't see any real gains from such a cleaning.

Most recently, I decided to put on JHM Intake Manifold spacers. Obviously, taking off the manifold was necessary.




It only took a lil over an hour to remove the manifold. It was pretty straight forward with the DIY guide I found on JHMs website. Once I got the manifold off, I couldn't help but inspect what the valves looked like...




PLENTY of buildup and oil residue. I spent the next 3-4 hours with brake cleaner and picks, scraping away at everything. It wasn't perfect when I was done, but definitely cleaner.

Now I can definitely feel how much smoother the engine runs. So, my two cents... at bare minimum pull the manifold off and invest in 4-5 cans of brake cleaner. But, at best, still pull the manifold off and buy/rent a media blaster. Dump in some walnut shell material and go at it. When you see some of the pictures of what this processes does with the valves... its worth it!!!
 

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This is the guide I used... if you wanna tackle it yourself...

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9u3x5sr13xu3mr7/S5 4.2 Intake Removal Guide.pdf


If you do, budget about 1.5 for manifold removal. About 3-4 hours to scrape or 2 hours to hit them with a blaster. And then about an hour to put the manifold back on. If you purchase the same spacers I did, plan to undo all of the clamps that hold down your fuel lines under the manifold, so that you can have enough slack to reattach them to your HPFPs and distribution block. You will also skip reattaching the two screws that hold your oil bypass to the engine. You the spacers bump everything up, so the holes wont line up anymore. But, the system itself, remains intact.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is the guide I used... if you wanna tackle it yourself...

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9u3x5sr13xu3mr7/S5 4.2 Intake Removal Guide.pdf


If you do, budget about 1.5 for manifold removal. About 3-4 hours to scrape or 2 hours to hit them with a blaster. And then about an hour to put the manifold back on. If you purchase the same spacers I did, plan to undo all of the clamps that hold down your fuel lines under the manifold, so that you can have enough slack to reattach them to your HPFPs and distribution block. You will also skip reattaching the two screws that hold your oil bypass to the engine. You the spacers bump everything up, so the holes wont line up anymore. But, the system itself, remains intact.
Great intel!

To highjack my own thread...what is the purpose of the manifold spacer? I've been around the block on cars but not a big modifier guy...that's a new one on me!

I have no issue pulling the manifold myself but I'm not sure I have the patience for the media blasting evening knowing I'm all about DIY and save $$$.

Do you have to rotate the crank around to close the valves at the right spot so media doesn't enter the chamber?
Suck them all out with a shop vac?
Any concern with all that brake cleaner sliding down the cylinder walls...or nothing a oil change wouldn't cure?

thanks again.
 

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Intake manifold spacers can provide two nice benefits.

A: They create a larger separation between the block and the manifold. This separation reduces the heat transfer which then reduces the intake air temperatures.

B: The separation elongates the intake runner length, which has some increased torque benefits.

As far as the blasting, do some video searches. The process doesn't look that tough, as long as you have the right equipment. It's just really important to rotate the crank so that you can get the valves closed prior to cleaning with the media.

If you choose the manual way, with chemicals and scraping, you won't have to worry about the closing of the valves as much. Just be ready for a bunch of misfires when you first start the motor up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great link here:

If you watch BMW has a nifty little adapter to fit in the port for blowing walnuts as well as sucking them out. Any idea if VW/aftermarket has something similar?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As far as the blasting, do some video searches. The process doesn't look that tough, as long as you have the right equipment. It's just really important to rotate the crank so that you can get the valves closed prior to cleaning with the media.

If you choose the manual way, with chemicals and scraping, you won't have to worry about the closing of the valves as much. Just be ready for a bunch of misfires when you first start the motor up.
After watching so many videos on walnut blasting I think that is the way to go. I can fabricate some type of apparatus that fits in the intake for a shop vac and the media blaster wand...

Hopefully my last question:

Was the gasket reusable for you? Seems many say they are if you are careful and I wouldn't mind working this in as an annual spring cleaning once I purchased the blaster.
 

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The original gasket was in good shape and easy to remove without damaging it. But, I bought a new set with the spacers, just for peace of mind.
 

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2009 T2 3.6L VR6 FSI
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Hello everyone..

Old thread here but I thought I'd see if anyone had any thoughts on walnut media blasting. My Treg's 3.6 V6 has a bit over 200k KM and I'm thinking of doing it a shop that specializes in this procedure. Cost is about USD 260. So basically I'm thinking also of replacing the original intake gaskets as long as the manifold is off, just for peace of mind. Local VW dealer quoted me about USD 190 for the set (upper and lower). But I think I'll just buy them online. FCP Euro has an Elring branded set for $61.36, but I've never heard of Elring. Looked them up and they are a German manufacturer. Anyone heard of them or used their products?

Appreciate any comments or suggestions.

Thanks.
 

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2009 T2 3.6L VR6 FSI
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Anyone? 👆
 
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