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It does specifically mention the EA888 engine (which is gas) with engine codes CCTA, CBFA, CAEB, CAEA, or CDNC. The 3.0 TDIs have engine codes CATA, CJMA, CRCA, and CNRB.
 

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2006 V8 Touareg AIR, nav, hid
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Oh fun for VW. They also need to file one for the ad-blue system. A second one for the center bearing. A third one for the headlights, insulation that falls off (aka electrical failure) of the headlights and dim headlights (aka burn-out of the reflector surface). That is my VW bucket list of Failures, although one could argue adding the horn failures.
 

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Volkswagen Timing Chain Tensioner Lawsuit Filed in New Jersey | CarComplaints.com

Included on the long list of affected VAG models:


  • 2008-2013 Volkswagen Touareg (gas/TDI not specified)
  • 2011 Volkswagen Touareg Hybrid
What? The 2006 (Passat) and 2007 (Passat and Touareg) 3.6 were more prone to timing chain issues than the more recent models...I guess the main culprit in 2007 was an incorrectly torqued factory bolt on oil sprocket on some... still maybe haven't been paying attention, is this really that common?? only read of a few instances.
 

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Would that be "VW failures to experience before you die", or "VW failures to experience before you junk the car"?
LOL. More of the 2nd one. VW Failures you will experience before the car dies. Only the cars totaled under 30K will avoid these problems.
 

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What? The 2006 (Passat) and 2007 (Passat and Touareg) 3.6 were more prone to timing chain issues than the more recent models...I guess the main culprit in 2007 was an incorrectly torqued factory bolt on oil sprocket on some... still maybe haven't been paying attention, is this really that common?? only read of a few instances.
What got Honda and Toyota such a loyal following was that if you took a dealer serviced vehicle in with 100,000 miles and this happened, you would either leave with a rebuilt or a new engine under good will.

If you take a VW serviced vehicle in at 65,000 miles with this problem, you will leave service with a "this is your effing problem." and a visit from sales. "We would think this would be a good time for you to buy a new VW. Oh, your trade in value... yeah, too bad about that. But why not trade it in anyway. The longer you keep it the more it will cost you."

Anyone is welcomed to disagree with me, but I feel strongly that if you have a vehicle factory serviced and all maintenance done at the dealer, then problems like a bad timing chain should be covered. Either it was a bad chain from the factory or bad engineering. Proper maintenance to me means at least 150,000 to 200,000 on a chain.
 

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What got Honda and Toyota such a loyal following was that if you took a dealer serviced vehicle in with 100,000 miles and this happened, you would either leave with a rebuilt or a new engine under good will.

If you take a VW serviced vehicle in at 65,000 miles with this problem, you will leave service with a "this is your effing problem." and a visit from sales. "We would think this would be a good time for you to buy a new VW. Oh, your trade in value... yeah, too bad about that. But why not trade it in anyway. The longer you keep it the more it will cost you."

Anyone is welcomed to disagree with me, but I feel strongly that if you have a vehicle factory serviced and all maintenance done at the dealer, then problems like a bad timing chain should be covered. Either it was a bad chain from the factory or bad engineering. Proper maintenance to me means at least 150,000 to 200,000 on a chain.
100% agree. What I think would behoove the case is to include the 06' and 07' years as they would have many more cases / examples of VW's unwillingness to do the right thing. VW Vortex had a running thread on the 3.6 for these early years regarding exactly this. Admittedly it is a different failure (bolt verses tensioner), but same principle: VW not standing behind their product...
 

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Perhaps tying failure rates [per 100,000 vehicles] vs other manufacturers per year to the executive bonus program (which they seem to be so fond of) would help. Top bonus levels would ONLY be awarded if VW - as a corporation - scored as the 1st or 2nd and scaled down from there.
Might get management's attention that way.
 

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What got Honda and Toyota such a loyal following was that if you took a dealer serviced vehicle in with 100,000 miles and this happened, you would either leave with a rebuilt or a new engine under good will.

If you take a VW serviced vehicle in at 65,000 miles with this problem, you will leave service with a "this is your effing problem." and a visit from sales. "We would think this would be a good time for you to buy a new VW. Oh, your trade in value... yeah, too bad about that. But why not trade it in anyway. The longer you keep it the more it will cost you."

Anyone is welcomed to disagree with me, but I feel strongly that if you have a vehicle factory serviced and all maintenance done at the dealer, then problems like a bad timing chain should be covered. Either it was a bad chain from the factory or bad engineering. Proper maintenance to me means at least 150,000 to 200,000 on a chain.
The other thing that Toyota (and to a lesser extent Honda) do, is learn from the early failures. I had a 1987 GTI that was recalled in 1990 for a failing heater core. These cores started failing with the advent of the Golf in 1985. Fast forward to 1992, and I buy a Corrado that had a failing heater core and was later subject to a separate recall. That's seven years after the first issue with heater cores.

This Corrado had the 2.8L VR6, which is the predecessor to the VR6 in modern Touaregs. I find it interesting that I had the joy of spending an entire day in the garage replacing timing chain tensioners and guides; 10 years on, they apparently couldn't be bothered to learn from past failures.

The service center may be a place where they can enhance revenue through parts and service work, but long term it's a recipe for lost revenue on the showroom floor.
 

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What got Honda and Toyota such a loyal following was that if you took a dealer serviced vehicle in with 100,000 miles and this happened, you would either leave with a rebuilt or a new engine under good will.

If you take a VW serviced vehicle in at 65,000 miles with this problem, you will leave service with a "this is your effing problem." and a visit from sales. "We would think this would be a good time for you to buy a new VW. Oh, your trade in value... yeah, too bad about that. But why not trade it in anyway. The longer you keep it the more it will cost you."

Anyone is welcomed to disagree with me, but I feel strongly that if you have a vehicle factory serviced and all maintenance done at the dealer, then problems like a bad timing chain should be covered. Either it was a bad chain from the factory or bad engineering. Proper maintenance to me means at least 150,000 to 200,000 on a chain.
I was very disappointed when my timing chain on my 2005 Touareg "elongated". I am disappointed every time a maintenance issue has a cost with a comma. The other part of me admires all the engineering that went into the car that works well. It is a machine and will have issues. We pay to much already but perfection is an illusion. We pay general dynamics, lockheed martin billions to make aircraft and the engineering issues kill pilots. consider myself lucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is kind of old but in 1990 I was driving an '88 Jetta GLI 16V. I had literally just moved to Oregon on July 1st. On July 2nd the timing belt broke at just over 30000 miles. It was out of warranty. Engine basically destroyed, pistons slammed into valves etc. The owners manual said the first check of the timing belt wasn't due until 60000 miles. As a goodwill gesture VW supplied the parts but I had to pay the labor. My recollection is it cost me $1200.
 

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This is kind of old but in 1990 I was driving an '88 Jetta GLI 16V. I had literally just moved to Oregon on July 1st. On July 2nd the timing belt broke at just over 30000 miles. It was out of warranty. Engine basically destroyed, pistons slammed into valves etc. The owners manual said the first check of the timing belt wasn't due until 60000 miles. As a goodwill gesture VW supplied the parts but I had to pay the labor. My recollection is it cost me $1200.
Ah yes, I had the exact same year and everything..black with grey cloth interior and a 5 speed. Perhaps your old car? Drove from 98' to 2006. Fun car when it was running right...however it always had something wrong with it. Makes my Treg look as reliable as gravity... no idea on actual mileage as Odo was broken when I purchased and I didn't fix it until I traded it ...I did replace t belt about five times however and the transmission was rebuilt twice. Crazy thing is I STILL see it driving around...someone in Vancouver owns it!
 

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GM has had issues with their 3.6 when they extended oil changes to 7500 miles then reprogrammed o/c lites to come on at 5k miles. I am learnomg of too much drama with VAG autos when my 2 LS430's I have put 230 k miles on have been as dependable as gravity(I like that one). One wheel bearing one blown subwoofer. Comparable German vehicles in 04 would have been the Phaeton, S430 and A8 where I can imagine I would not have bought a second especially the Phaeton when I see them in for rediculous repairs when I take my Treg in for routine service.
 

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I like how the timing chain tensioning rail that broke in my 3.0 TDI Touareg is a different material and has been redesigned in the area where it actually broke. VWoA tells me:


"Please know as a manufacturer we are always looking for opportunities to improve, both in our service to our customers as well as with all aspects of our vehicles. With this in mind if improvements are made to a component or even just a feature, it does not specifically mean there was fault in the aforementioned or because a trend was identified. If a trend is indeed identified with a part we are proactive in researching either a warranty extension or recall to address the concern. In this instance, your vehicle does not have a warranty extension or recall for the component(s) needed for the current repair."


I call BS. I told them "No manufacturer is going to spend the time, resource or money to R&D for a part that has no issues." I am sure all the dealers that repaired these vehicles swept it under the rug and billed the customers because they didn't want to deal with VW to get these on a service campaign.
 

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You are completely correct in your analysis. Unfortunately, the corporate culture at VW means they will not take ANY corrective action regarding cars already sold unless/until their lawyers tell them it is going to cost them too much not to take action. (That cost includes public embarrassment.)
 

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I have heard nothing further of this class action suit. Do any of you have an update? As far as "VW failures to experience before you die," I've personally never had any drivetrain/mechanical plagues to vent about, but I have had heated seats in several Volkswagens stop working as early as 69K miles (on my 2004 Passat GLX wagon that I bought as a CPO at 58K). I bought my Mother a 2004 Passat GLX wagon identical to mine with 72K miles on it. Neither heated seat worked (the day I bought the car, it was 100+ degrees, so I couldn't tell if they were working or not). The only remedy being to replace the leather seat covers, at approximately $1,000 each, it is hardly practical to fix, yet we are denied a luxury that is expected on GLX models. One reason I chose the GLX with heated seats for my mother was because she had a hip replacement and in the cold winters, heated seats feel exceptionally comfortable to her. Very frustrating! I have wondered how many other VW owners have had their heated seats stop working at a very low mileage.
 
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