Club Touareg Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Please do not use that over the counter AC recharge kit, use the proper R134a stuff. The AC system is not something you want to do janky stuff with, it runs at fairly high pressures. This is one of those tings that if you don't have appropriate knowledge and tools, you should leave it with a professional. I've repaired many systems in the past that the owner "repaired" on his own - I basically had to replace the entire system due to damage or contamination.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I was going to start asking questions about feedback from people with experience in this field of with these type of DIY. Good to see you can share some experience. I'm just gathering info here about the system. I want to be able to troubleshoot and repair myself. I don't mind breaking stuff and repairing. Treg used parts are not that expensive over here. I haven't yet studied the AC system. I have Elsawin and ETKA and some SSPs. I will be going over all that material when I have the time. I want to have a definitive understanding of the components and how it works so as I remove all the guess work when I need to repair. Here is what happened with my treg:

  • Bought the Treg in summer 2017. I had to make the seller recharge the AC because it was blowing hot air. He recharged it.
  • Summer 2018 it was blowing hot air again. I recharged it in a shop.
  • Marsh 2020 it was blowing hissing and blowing hot air again. I recharged it. And this time I asked the guys to check for a leak. The machine reported the leak. I was in a hurry and I just asked them to recharge it anyway. Nobody proposed to add a leak detection additive. Maybe the shop's machine didn't support the feature.
Now I know I will have to recharge it maybe next summer. I know it is a small leak. It will hold for a year I think. I don’t use the Treg a lot.
So my plan is to learn how to recharge next time with a leak detection additive, repair the leak and recharge.
I want to take this opportunity to learn and do the stuff myself. BUT I do want to do it the right way. That's why I'm putting all the material here to help with the learning process and also help people understand what to look for and how to deal with such issues. I see lots of 'my ac is blowing hot' 'my ac is hissing' 'help with ac' so I want this thread to be some kind of a knowledge base for people to be armed with when either dealing with a mechanic or doing it themselves. The kits seem to be used by serious 'youtube mechanics'. I said it, 'Youtube'. The tools can help if they are used correctly like you said. You can also do bad stuff with a professional tool like the shop who wanted to put a certain generic amount of freon in the Touareg and I had to show him the Touareg specs from Elsawin to make him put the right amount based on 1 or 2 evaporators. If you can provide any help please do. I will get the kit with a vacuum pump. Remember I'm not opening a shop, I'm only doing it on my cars when needed. But I do want to do it right without breaking the bank of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So anyone used one those kits?
Anyone used a dye kit?
Anyone with hands-on expérience with A/C DIY.
I'm even tempted to buy an A/C recovery kit just for the fun of it.
Let's make this the official A/C thread :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
I’m a red-seal heavy duty mechanic with A/C certification - do not use one of those parts stores “diy” ac recharge kits. They’re usually mostly propane or similar and will eventually wreck your system, as well as making it volatile. It will also contaminate the recovery tank of the AC machine in the future.
I’d advise against making your own hoses too - they’re readily available from VW. The system runs at high pressure. Unless you have experience properly flaring or crimping, buy OEM.

Every PAG oil that I’ve used has already had a UV dye in it, no need to add anything else in.

I’m all for DIY/making things etc, but the AC system is one of those areas that you Should leave OEM and have a professional perform the recharge. If you’re trying to save money, what i’d recommend for you is to have a shop inject the UV dye and perform a vacuum leak, then once the leak is found you could replace the component yourself, then have them re-test and recharge.
I’m all for DIY/making things etc, but the AC system is one of those areas that you Should leave OEM and have a professional perform the recharge. If you’re trying to save money, what i’d recommend for you is to have a shop inject the UV dye and perform a vacuum leak, then once the leak is found you could replace the component yourself, then have them re-test and recharge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
If you wish to track down the leak, go to your local welding supply company and rent a bottle of nitrogen. You’ll have to gather some hose and fittings to connect the nitrogen tank to the AC system. Slowly open the nitrogen valve and build around 100psi. Leak should be fairly evident.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the advice. I appreciate it. Now what if I wanted to be able to recharge the ac system myself using some high quality tools. It’s not really about the money. It’s mostly about independence and learning to do things when I want to. Do you have any info on the choice of tools. I’d like to buy an ac recovery machine too. I would like to repair my ac hoses. I have the vw procedure and the they do put the repair tools there so I’m good with cutting and repairing. I’m rewiring different stuff in the treg. I’m not rewiring the ac system though. I just want to be able to repair a hose the right way, track a leak the right way and recover gaz or recharge the right way. I know it requires some learning effort but I’m all in. I’ve read that all recent ac systems come with a dye. I’m not sure the last shop who recharged the system use dye in their procedure or if it is included by default in their machine. I’ll have to call them and inquire before buying a leak detection kit. I’m more inclined to use a leak detection dye kit with a few grams than using the nitrogen bottle. Might be easier with the bottle but the leak detection kits come with the hose and the connector and take a few seconds to inject.
So next step is getting the right hoses and the right manifold with gauges. I’m a bit surprised you’re firmly against using those kits. Maybe I can mod them to have something decent. What about the vaccum pumps? What if I buy a recovery machine? Does it have all the bits or do I still need the vacuum pump and the other bits? I haven’t researched recovery machines yet.
I will get a uv light first to check with. When my ac was blowing hot it was also hissing.
I will be posting info here so if you can amend or correct stuff or add info please do. Don’t get frustrated with my way of doing things. I don’t mind breakung the Treg. It’s not my daily drive. So stay with us please :)
I have a friend who owns a metal shop and can mod all kinds of stuff too and I made him buy a v6 3.2 just like mine. And he doesn’t like people touching his cars just like me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
This guy uses a simple easy leak detection kit:




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top